Undergraduate

Course descriptions may be updated periodically to reflect changes since the last published catalog.
  • ENT-101 Business Foundations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Arts Admin Minor Elective

  • ENT-H101 Business Foundations

    Prerequisites:

    GPA of 3.3 or above required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENT-110 Do You Want to Start a Business?

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Courses in the 550s are new offerings in Entrepreneurship. Special topics are announced when the courses are scheduled. Prerequisites vary from course to course. Do You Want to Start a Business? This introductory survey course is designed to help students learn about starting a business and assess their personal interest in pursuing such activity. Topics cover the range of business start-up activities from personal assessment to opportunity recognition, market assessment, feasibility determination, financial planning, legal, human resources, and business planning.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-210 Do You Want to Start a Business?

    Prerequisites:

    Must have completed at least 15 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Do you want to start a business? This survey course is designed to help students learn about starting a business and assess their personal interest in pursuing such activity. Topics cover the range of business start-up activities from personal evaluation to opportunity recognition, market assessment, feasibility determination, financial planning, legal, human resources, and business planning.

  • ENT-280 Opportunity Recognition and Discovery

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 101 and Sophomore Standing. For sections designated for ENT majors and minors only, only ENT majors and minors may enroll in those sections. For sections designated for Non-ENT majors and minors, ENT majors and minors are not allowed.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Ever wonder how entrepreneurs get their ideas? In this course, you will learn a deliberate process of opportunity recognition and discovery. You will learn how to generate ideas taking into consideration rarity, value, and your entrepreneurial fit. Through this process, you will gain an understanding or your knowledge, skills and abilities intended to improve the likelihood of success. Once your opportunity is identified, you will determine the feasibility of its feasibility from concept to an industry and competitive analysis.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-300 Legal and Financial Risk With Startups

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 201 AND ENT 280.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Expand upon your feasibility plan from ENT 280, or identify a new opportunity, and learn about the financial and legal considerations that need to be addressed to determine whether or not your opportunity is a go or no go with respect to moving your opportunity forward towards business plan development. Legal topics include: business organization, employment practices, taxation and independent contractors, intellectual property, contracts and governance. Financial topics include: verifying the business model and related cost structure, making credible assumptions, preparing forecast financial statements, all leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H300 Legal and Financial Risk With Startups

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Expand upon your feasibility plan from ENT 280, or identify a new opportunity, and learn about the financial and legal considerations that need to be addressed to determine whether or not your opportunity is a go or no go with respect to moving your opportunity forward towards business plan development. Legal topics include: business organization, employment practices, taxation and independent contractors, intellectual property, contracts and governance. Financial topics include: verifying the business model and related cost structure, making credible assumptions, preparing forecast financial statements, all leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENT-309 Entrepreneurship I - Creating Value

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101, MKT-210, SBS-220, and MKT-220(MKT-220 may be taken concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you create value within a new venture or existing firm? Entrepreneurs will explore their innovative mindset, action orientation, and willingness to assume the responsibility necessary to bring new products, services and businesses to the market. Methods of detecting pain or gaps in the market place (idea generation), pursuing dreams, and utilizing design thinking, as well as business models around leveraging new opportunities will be explored. Students will gain the knowledge necessary for generating and vetting opportunities.

  • ENT-315 Entrepreneurial Skills

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 280 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Knowledge of business alone, or having an idea, is not sufficient for the entrepreneur. You must also learn how to manage yourself and others as you prepare for you first day of business. This course is designed to provide you with the knowledge and skills to build and lead a startup or growing organization through lessons and experiential team projects. Skills covered in this course include: self management, negotiations, networking, sales, conflict/collaboration, and teams.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H315 Honors Entrepreneurial Skills

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENT-280 or ENT-H280; GPA of 3.3 or higher

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Knowledge of business alone, or having an idea, is not sufficient for the entrepreneur. You must also learn how to manage yourself and others as you prepare for you first day of business. This course is designed to provide you with the knowledge and skills to build and lead a startup or growing organization through lessons and experiential team projects. Skills covered in this course include: self management, negotiations, networking, sales, conflict/collaboration, and teams.

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENT-319 Measuring Value (Entrepreneurship II) And Family Business

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-280 or ENT-309 and ACCT-201, ACCT-202, FIN-200, and SBS-220 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you measure the value-added by a new business opportunity? In this course, you will start developing a financial toolkit and skill set to assess the value of a new product, service, or business. Financial implications of different business models and characteristics of various industries will be discussed. Major topics covered will include 1) forecasting (generating pro-forma financial statements), 2) financial analysis (liquidity, profitability, break-even, and feasibility analyses), 3) sources of funding (bootstrapping, family & friends, crowdfunding, angel investors, venture capital funds, and loans) and 4) basics of valuation.

  • ENT-320 Growing and Managing the Firm

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you manage the day-to-day challenges of starting a new venture or working on a small business? This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution. This course utilizes case analysis, role-plays, simulations, and other experiential lessons to help provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to build and lead a new or innovative organization.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Arts Admin Minor Elective

  • ENT-H320 Honors- Small Business Management

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you manage the day-to-day challenges or working in a small business or starting a new venture? This case-driven course covers the role and importance of small business in the U.S. economy, including the application of all management functions to the operation of a small business; human resources, operations, financial, risk and growth. This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENT-322 Entrepreneurship & the European Union

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    95% of the world's consumers are outside of the United States, and yet, only one-quarter of small businesses are engaged in global commerce. Yet, small businesses represent more than 95% of all exporters from the U.S. Globalization is critical, but are there some regions in the world that are more attractive than others? The European Union (EU) has a population of more than 500 million people, yet, there is a lesser tolerance for risk, thus failure is viewed more negatively than the U.S. The United States takes greater risks, experiences a higher degree of failure, and yet, the number of new startups remain consistently around 600,000 every year for a country with a population of more than 300 million people. Is the EU a viable option for U.S. startup growth or opportunities? What are the issues of a union that consists of nearly 30 countries with economic constraints and political forces that appear more restrictive than the United States? How can United States startups leverage a stable economic structure in a region that is more than 7% and nearly twice the size of U.S. consumers? In this course, you will learn the opportunities and challenges between two economically strong regions of the world that encompasses nearly one billion potential consumers. Prerequisites: Junior Standing. This course counts as an ENT major elective.

  • ENT-H322 Entrepreneurship & the European Union

    Prerequisites:

    Over 54 credits earned.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    95% of the world's consumers are outside of the United States, and yet, only one-quarter of small businesses are engaged in global commerce. Yet, small businesses represent more than 95% of all exporters from the U.S. Globalization is critical, but are there some regions in the world that are more attractive than others? The European Union (EU) has a population of more than 500 million people, yet, there is a lesser tolerance for risk, thus failure is viewed more negatively than the U.S. The United States takes greater risks, experiences a higher degree of failure, and yet, the number of new startups remain consistently around 600,000 every year for a country with a population of more than 300 million people. Is the EU a viable option for U.S. startup growth or opportunities? What are the issues of a union that consists of nearly 30 countries with economic constraints and political forces that appear more restrictive than the United States? How can United States startups leverage a stable economic structure in a region that is more than 7% and nearly twice the size of U.S. consumers? In this course, you will learn the opportunities and challenges between two economically strong regions of the world that encompasses nearly one billion potential consumers. Prerequisites: Junior Standing. This course counts as an ENT major elective.

    Type:

    Global Engagement Experience,Honors

  • ENT-324 Leading the Entrepreneurial Firm

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you interested in leading, growing and troubleshooting the entrepreneurial small business? This course provides a detailed analysis of and hands-on experience with the competencies required to lead and grow startups and small businesses. Competencies include the utilization of teams, understanding of the team, organizational characteristics, and level of entrepreneurial thinking that will be accomplished through assessment and practical analysis. Students will complete the course with an understanding of 1) small business leadership skills, 2) team effectiveness skills, 3) decision-making in times of economic growth and stress.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-326 Writing the Business Plan

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 300, ACCT 201, ACCT 202 and Junior Standing.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Use your knowledge from your entrepreneurship courses and experience up to this point to create a viable business plan that will lend credibility to the viability of your potential audience, which may include investors, financial institutions, suppliers, family or friends. In this course, you will write a business plan that shapes your opportunity into a model that resembles a venture. You will then defend the plan addressing the venture's business model, management team, organization, customers, markets, competitors, operations and risk, all leading to financials that will determine the amount of capital you will need, as well as financing alternatives.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H326 Writing the Business Plan

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENT-300 ACCT-201 ACCT-202;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Use your knowledge from your entrepreneurship courses and experience up to this point to create a viable business plan that will lend credibility to the viability of your potential audience, which may include investors, financial institutions, suppliers, family or friends. In this course, you will write a business plan that shapes your opportunity into a model that resembles a venture. You will then defend the plan addressing the venture's business model, management team, organization, customers, markets, competitors, operations, and risk, all leading to financials that will determine the amount of capital you will need, as well as financing alternatives.

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENT-329 Protecting Value (Entrepreneurship III) Value

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-280 or ENT-309 and ENT-300 or ENT-319 and ENT-326 or ENT-329 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How does protection of intellectual property, and human, physical, and financial capital add value to the new or existing organization? Entrepreneurs will learn appropriate legal protections related to people and property associated with the firm. Major topics covered will include 1)legal protection (patents, copyrights, trademarks, service marks, trade secrets, business organizations, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements, employment agreements, stock/ownership restrictions), 2)human resources(creating and managing teams, hiring, firing, organizational structure, employment/independent contractor issues, and compensation strategies), and 3)growing business value(merger, acquisition, and other expansion techniques).

  • ENT-336 Family Business I - The Family

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Did you know that nearly 70% of family businesses fail in the second generation? Why? There are two key factors: the family and the business. This course focuses on the challenges of family dynamics, including culture, gender, age, birth order, etc., to help you gain an understanding of the impact of family on the business. This course will also address succession issues related to changes in management, ownership, expansion, inheritance, and exit/termination.

  • ENT-337 Family Business II

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and at least 54 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The business of the family business is just as critical as the family dynamics. This course focuses on issues related to adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include the development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

  • ENT-350 Social Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ENT-352 Green and Sustainable Business

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENT-H352 Green and Sustainable Business

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENT-353 Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

  • ENT-354 Global Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-355 Design Thinking & Biomimicry

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Ever wonder what great breakthroughs are on the horizon to improve business thinking, processes, products, and services? If you have, this course is for you. We will learn about how businesses are using principles of design thinking and biomimicry to create entirely new ways of meeting the challenges of modern business: those are, needs to reduce costs, increase revenues, minimize waste & energy use, maximize novel approaches, & meet consumer and business needs. You may recognize the term design thinking if you are a follower of Apple, Inc. which has used this process in the development of all of their products and services over the past 15 years. Biomimicry principles are those that seek their inspiration from nature; after all, nature has been problem-solving for 3.8 billion years -- surely there is something to learn from this to be adapted to solving modern challenges. The course will be both conceptual and practical with various experiential learning opportunities.

  • ENT-356 Bootstrapping the Firm With Social Media

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 201 and Junior Standing.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Did you ever wonder how you are going to start a business or run an existing small business without enough capital? This is a very common phenomenon where startups and small businesses are typically undercapitalized and need to maximize internally-generated cash flow to not only start of run the business, but to also grow. Centered around an experiential process, this course will identify how to internally generate cash flow with the realization that more than 90% of all ventures operate in a bootstrapping environment. This course will identify a strong understanding of cash inflows, outflows, and maximizing both components to generate additional capital necessary for the business's requirements.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-358 Designing New Products

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-360 Launching the E-Business

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This experiential course is an entrepreneurial approach towards developing a real e-commerce business. Students will build off their marketing skills and entrepreneurial ambitions by a) advancing e-commerce ideas to opportunities, b) understanding the product, logistical, marketing, and managerial challenges associated with e-commerce startups, and c) developing financial models to predict and measure performance. This will be accomplished by students developing a launch plan for the opportunity, as well as executing portions of the launch plan.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-361 Sell It!

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you sell new products and services? Revenue is key to business survival, and this isn't by accident and a strong marketing strategy is not enough. Sales is a process, as well as an attitude. Strong organizations drive revenue through sound sales processes that are effectively designed, implemented, and scaled. In this course, you will learn how to sell new products and services through selling techniques, as well as create a value statement, identify a target market, create an effective approach, develop a sales activity and pipeline tracking system, design and effective sales management and coaching program.

  • ENT-362 Legal and Ethical Issues in Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    Take BLE-214 or BLE-H214; junior standing required

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you protect yourself, your venture, and your intellectual property when starting a new business? In this course, you will learn the substantive areas of the law that are essential to entrepreneurs and an integration of that knowledge with ethics. Specifically, you will gain a stronger understanding of a) how to select a law firm that best fits the startup and b) how to protect your intellectual property through the use of trademarks, copyrights, patents, trade secrets, non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements. You will also learn how startups can protect their interests through the use of organizational structures and related equity restrictions and employment agreements. From the ethics standpoint, this course will focus on corporate governance and the importance of a management leading an ethical culture. We will examine substantive areas of the law that create legal risk and point to ethical issues within an organization. An important element for the entrepreneur is communication skills; therefore this course will have a major writing assignment along with a speaking requirement.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-366 Managing the Restaurant

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Do you want to start or manage a restaurant? The restaurant industry is highly competitive with high turnover. The challenges are tough enough when you understand the business, however, too many entrepreneurs who start or many restaurants lack the necessary experience. This course will help you understand the crucial elements of launching or managing a restaurant, including: business organization, funding, location, market analysis, lease v. buy, facility layout, professional resources, licensing, human resources, technology, purchasing, advertising, insurance, record-keeping, and expansion.

  • ENT-419 Entrepreneurship IV - Delivering Value (E-Clinic)

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-280 - OR - ENT-309, AND ENT-300 - OR - ENT-319, AND ENT-326 - OR - ENT-329 and Senior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Before you launch your venture, our capstone course gives you an opportunity to assess and consult with other startups through the eyes of their founders. This course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial majors develop and practice their business skills working with real startups and small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course is a transition from student to professional under the supervision of a faculty member who serves as a coach and advisor. Students will learn to interview client organizations, assess the current business, negotiate a statement of work, and develop a project management plan that leads to the consultant-client negotiated deliverable(s). Depending on the client organization, this course will most likely include visiting the client location.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H419 Delivering Value (Entrepreneurship V)

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-309, ENT-319, ENT-326, ENT-329 and Senior Standing, and at least a 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This capstone course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial majors develop and practice their business skills working with real startups or small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course is a transition from student to professional under the supervision of a faculty member, coach and advisor. Students will learn to assess client situations, develop alternatives and identify and defend solutions, at times within the client organization. Prerequisites: SOM 101 or MGT 101, MKT 210 or MKT 310, FIN 310, MGT 317, ISOM 319, ENT 315, ENT 326 and Senior standing. 1 term - 3 credits.

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENT-420 Launching a New Venture

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-309, ENT-319, ENT-326, and ENT-329, and Senior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you looking for the nuts and bolts of launching a new venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits working with our Center for Entrepreneurship. Students will draft a launch plan, with specific executables, necessary to launch a new venture. Students will use knowledge from major core courses to determine business organization, capitalization, hiring employees, building the team, establishing benefits, selecting facilities, etc.

  • ENT-436 Managing the Family Business

    Prerequisites:

    MGT-217(MGT 317), Junior standing,

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENT-510 Entrepreneurship Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Senior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you looking for an ENT major elective to help you continue with research associated with your opportunity of venture? This independent study is available to students who are looking to expand on their classroom experience by doing additional research related to their prospective opportunity or venture. Students must draft the statement of work related to the independent study, with a primary focus on solving a problem or problems through extensive research, as well as have an ENT faculty member supervise the student during the study. The statement of work must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the statement of work is completed, the student must attach the statement of work to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-520 Launching the New Venture

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 326 and Senior Standing This course may be used as an ENT major elective or taken instead of ENT 419.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you looking for guidance to launch your venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits through an independent study working with faculty and alumni through our Center for Entrepreneurial Studies. Students must draft a launch plan based on their business plan prepared in ENT 326, modified based on feedback received from faculty and judges during the ENT 326 presentations. Students must demonstrate enough evidence to support that the venture will be launched, as well as completing all tasks identified in the launch plan by the end of the semester to receive credit for the course. An ENT faculty member must supervise the student during the launch. The launch plan must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the launch plan is completed, the student must attach the plan to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-521 Entrepreneurship Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Junior standing and instructor approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

  • MGT-200 Leadership and Social Responsibility

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Status

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on management challenges faced by leaders of not-for-profit organizations. Through a hands-on team project students will create innovative solutions to a specific organizational opportunity/issue and present these to a panel of external judges. Students will also create sustainability plans so their ideas have life after the course ends. Due to the experiential nature of this course, it will be taught in an intensive format.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-217 Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    At least 30 credit hours and WRI 102 (formerly ENG 102) or WRI 103 (formerly ENG 103) or SBS 220

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-H217 Honors in Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); WRI 102 (formerly ENG 102) or WRI-103 and 45 or more credits and at least a 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Honors

  • MGT-301 Leading Change

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Change is constant in all industries and work settings. Accordingly there is constant demand for people who can understand the need for change, make complex, strategic and realistic change plans, and lead others through a successful implementation of a planned change. This lively case-based course will focus on managerial and leadership skill-building in the areas of change management through the careful and thorough analysis of change-focused case studies. Students will be expected to conduct both individual and group-based analyses of complex business cases; including the preparation of written case analyses, active participation in case discussions, and delivery of case analyses through oral presentation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-302 Developing Innovation Skills

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This highly interactive and experiential course will help you to develop your creative skills for business and life success. Corporate leaders consider creativity [1] to be an essential skill. However, according to a recent Conference Board study [2], college graduates lack the creativity and innovation skills needed to succeed in the workplace. The Council on Competitiveness warns that companies that do not embrace innovation (and creativity) as a core business value will fall to global competition.[3] We will discuss meaning of life issues that will serve to clarify your thinking and help you align your values and belief-systems with what you do on a daily basis at work and throughout your life. A substantial body of evidence indicates that people tend to be more creative when working on projects that interest them, and most creative when passionately immersed in their endeavors. We will focus on enhancing creativity in the workplace to achieve defined organizational needs, to add economic value to the organization, and to create social value as well. We will also focus on helping you to understand and apply a wide array of creative processes and tools to develop your creative competencies and skills. We will use breakout groups, role plays, experiential exercises, and discussions to facilitate your learning. This course is an invitation to you to explore and define what you want to create in your life. [1] The Conference Board defines creativity/innovation as the ability to demonstrate originality, inventiveness in work, communicate new ideas to others, and integrate knowledge across disciplines. [2] Are They Ready To Work: Employers' Perspectives on the Basic Knowledge and Applied Skills of New Entrants to the 21st Century Workforce. 2006. [3] Innovate America: Thriving in a World of Challenge and Change. July, 2004. National Innovation Initiative, Council on Competitiveness.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Creativity and Innovation

  • MGT-313 Global Human Resource Management

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course includes a study of the modern human resources department in industry with special emphasis on the techniques and methods of management, utilization of people, and contemporary human resource issues and problems.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • MGT-317 Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-103 or SBS-220 and ENT-101 and at least 45 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-H317 Honors in Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102,SOM 101 or MGT 101, must have completed 45 credits Honors section, GPA of 3.2 or higher

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Honors

  • MGT-320 Small Business Management

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you manage the day-to-day challenges or working in a small business or starting a new venture? This case-driven course covers the role and importance of small business in the U.S. economy, including the application of all management functions to the operation of a small business; human resources, operations, financial, risk and growth. This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-322 Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317) or Instructor's consent required; Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores multicultural diversity in business organizations. In order to learn to effectively manage diversity in the workplace, it is first necessary to become familiar with the concepts and dynamics that underlie many of the organizational issues associated with increased diversity in the workplace. Thus, this course is structured to first study topics such as identity, perception, socialization, stereotyping, and prejudice. With these concepts as a foundation, we will explore the opportunities and challenges created by diversity in the workplace. We will consider issues and dynamics that arise in the workplace as a result of diversity in terms of gender, race, national origin, sexual orientation, and religion. After developing a rich understanding of workplace diversity dynamics, we will consider actions that individuals and organizations can take to address the opportunities and challenges inherent in a diverse workforce to gain competitive advantage. .

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-330 Interpersonal Effectiveness

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (SBS 101) and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with knowledge of and skills in interpersonal effectiveness. The course is designed to convey the importance of interpersonal skills in today's business climate. Students learn and develop interpersonal skills commonly required of supervisors/managers.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-331 Leadership

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the principles of leadership and the core competencies, traits and behaviors that enable effective leadership. It is an interactive, event-driven program to develop, refine and refresh leadership qualities through activities, individual assessments, coaching, research and dynamic group discussion to practice and develop individual skills. Students will examine various leadership theories, identify styles and preferences, practice conflict management and team building, feedback and expectation setting by applying class room/real world situations to their own learning.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-333 Bldg. a Positive Organization

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    From store or restaurant managers to regional directors to executives of large corporations, you as a leader must learn how to create a positive work environment for your employees so that they can flourish, become resilient in the face of adversity, and achieve extraordinary performance. In this course, you will learn concepts fundamental to building a positive culture, such as social learning, reciprocity, supportive communication, and forgiveness, gratitude and compassion. These concepts will then be applied to a variety of management issues, such as building core values and mission statements, designing a standardized hiring process, creating a sustainable training and staff development program, developing onboarding experiences, enhancing organizational communication, conducting performance evaluations and critical conversations, and managing organizational change.

  • MGT-H333 Building a Positive Organization

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    From store or restaurant managers to regional directors to executives of large corporations, you as a leader must learn how to create a positive work environment for your employees so that they can flourish, become resilient in the face of adversity, and achieve extraordinary performance. In this course, you will learn concepts fundamental to building a positive culture, such as social learning, reciprocity, supportive communication, and forgiveness, gratitude and compassion. These concepts will then be applied to a variety of management issues, such as building core values and mission statements, designing a standardized hiring process, creating a sustainable training and staff development program, developing onboarding experiences, enhancing organizational communication, conducting performance evaluations and critical conversations, and managing organizational change.

    Type:

    Honors

  • MGT-334 Introduction to Business Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the core functions and skills required to be a Business Analyst, an agent of change using a systematic approach to add value within an organization. Students will learn how to understand business needs and perspectives in order to develop effective and focused solutions to problems across the Business Solutions Life Cycle, from strategy through to operational results. Using case studies and exercises, this course provides an overview of business analysis, introduces key skills such as project definition, the role of assumptions, critical analytical skills, interpretation of information, communication and implementation.

  • MGT-335 Managing Across Cultures

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    To what extent are our identities. ways of thinking, and behaving the products of our cultural environments? How do conceptions of motivation, leadership, decision making, negotiation, and ethics differ across cultures? How do expatriates settle abroad, and how do they re-enter the American life they are once so familiar? The purpose of this course is to examine the international context of management, specifically, the cross-cultural environment and how it shapes managers' and work organization members' experiences, roles and responsibilities.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-360 Leadership 360 Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); does not count toward the Management Major, nor the minor for BSBA students

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Leadership 360 Practicum provides a fundamental understanding of the principles of leadership and the core competencies, traits and behaviors that enable effective leadership. Students will conduct an in-depth self-examination of skills, abilities, personality, attitudes, values, and behaviors to increase self-awareness of their leadership competencies. Students will learn relevant leadership theories and introductory project management principles and techniques. They will apply leadership and project management skills in a mini-team project with a not-for-profit organization that seeks solutions to a specific challenge, leading to a project implementation plan. Students will present formally to the client; feedback to the presenters will reinforce their oral communication skills. This course is a requirement for all BSBA majors.

  • MGT-401 Negotiations

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Arts Admin Minor Elective

  • MGT-419 Senior Capstone Project Course

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); MKT 210; MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); ISOM 319; Management Majors and Minors only with 90 or more credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This capstone course allows students to integrate and apply their acquired knowledge in pro bono consulting projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor, coach and advisor. Course skills to be developed include project management, business communication, and action-oriented analysis. Students analyze real-world problems using primary and secondary research methods, identify feasible options for action, and make professional written and oral presentations to their client organization. An occasional Friday class may be required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Junior standing and instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00- 3.00

    Description:

    Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

  • MGT-520 Management Internship

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Management Major; Junior or Senior standing; 3.0 GPA; Instructor consent required; Cannot take this course concurrent with any other internship course

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    MGT 520 is an internship course which offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in management courses to a valuable work experience outside the University. Interns practice using management principles in a carefully selected real world work situation under the direction of a faculty member, while completing academic requirements intended to integrate theory and practice. Students can also use the internship to explore career interests. Sometimes building a relationship with an employer during an internship can lead to a job offer during school or after graduation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-H520 Honors Management Internship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students an opportunity to apply management concepts and skills to problem solving in an organizational workplace setting. Students identify and organize their internship position and particular project (depending on area of interest) with assistance from faculty, as needed. Projects will vary in scope and content. Students are expected to be on the job for approximately 8 hours per week during the course of the semester.

    Type:

    Honors

  • MGT-560 Leadership Journey Experience

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Suffolk University Student Leadership and Involvement Office oversees The Leadership Journey Program. The program is designed to develop student's leadership skills throughout their collegiate career at Suffolk University. Students are expected to experience all aspects of the cornerstones as they begin the Journey. After this exposure, students are encouraged to focus on the leadership activities in which they are more passionate. The Leadership Journey focuses on providing students with experiences in leadership, campus involvement and service. Students completing the Leadership Journey will have complemented their leadership course material with experiences in actual leadership situations.Suffolk University Student Leadership and Involvement Office oversees The Leadership Journey Program. The program is designed to develop student's leadership skills throughout their collegiate career at Suffolk University. Students are expected to experience all aspects of the cornerstones as they begin the Journey. After this exposure, students are encouraged to focus on the leadership activities in which they are more passionate. The Leadership Journey focuses on providing students with experiences in leadership, campus involvement and service. Students completing the Leadership Journey will have complemented their leadership course material with experiences in actual leadership situations.