mootCourt

In conjunction with the law school faculty, local attorneys, and members of the Massachusetts Judiciary, the Moot Court Honor Board is run entirely by students, providing them the opportunity to develop and hone their advocacy skills prior to entering the legal community.

The Honor Board has two responsibilities: managing and organizing four intra-scholastic competitions and publishing the Suffolk Journal of Trial & Appellate Advocacy.

The competitions are carefully designed in order to create the most realistic experience possible.  The Board relies upon members of the judiciary and prominent practitioners to serve as judges for every round of each competition.

The Suffolk Journal of Trial & Appellate Advocacy is published twice a year. It provides practical and in-depth analyses of current legal issues relating to trial and appellate practice. It is comprised of lead articles submitted by outside authors with expertise in their respective fields, and student-written Notes and Case Comments submitted by MCHB staff members. Journal members select a unique topic, research primary and secondary legal sources, analyze the legal issues facing the trial and appellate advocacy community, and write an original piece for publication.

Experience on the Honor Board helps you stand out from other law school graduates: writing and researching briefs and records for the intra-scholastic competitions on real-world issues like the kidnapping and murder of a 14-year-old girl; or if a drug search and seizure initiated by a woman’s ex-husband was malicious prosecution.

Members also assist in choosing and inviting judges and lawyers who make up competition judicial panels, and help organize the event and post-competition reception – giving students networking opportunities and experience organizing legal events.

Eligibility

All students who have finished their first year are eligible for membership. Students compete for openings on the board by participating in the annual Write-On competition, where topics are chosen from emerging issues in the courts.

Students who finish first in their section have an automatic bid to the board. Preference is also given to students who finish the top 25 percent of their section, or have gotten a Legal Practice Skills Program (LPS) award for best oral advocate or best brief. The final step for candidates is an interview by current Honor Board members.

Students typically spend their first year working on the Journal of Trial & Appellate Advocacy, and then run for positions on the editorial board in their second year.