Undergraduate

  • AMST-111 Defining America and Americans

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines artistic, social, and political imaginings of America and Americans. We will read works by American and foreign observers of the United States to ask how Americans define themselves and how others see them. Course assignments will introduce students to themes, perspectives, and methods in the field of American Studies.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • AS-100 Introduction to Asian Studies: Culture, People, Ideas

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Asian Studies,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Divers

  • BLKST-100 Introduction to Black Studies I: Survey of the Discipline

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to the basic concepts and literature in the disciplines covered by Black Studies as well as providing a conceptual framework for the investigation and analysis of Black history and culture.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • BLKST-101 Introduction to Black Studies II Research and Writing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to basic research techniques and methods in Black Studies including library use, identifying resources, project development, documenting sources, and writing research papers.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social Science

  • BLKST-169 African-American Genealogy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students are introduced to resources and techniques in African American genealogy and will explore methods of applying genealogical research to the larger African American and American story by working on an African American genealogy project. Note: This course is identical to HST 169.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • BLKST-250 Haiti, Guadalupe and Martinique

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the rich intellectual tradition of Haiti, Guadeloupe, and Martinique by considering historical moments linked to colonialism, the abolition of slavery, the representation of gender, departmentalization, and decolonization through essays, films, poems, novels, and short stories by critics and writers from the 19th-21st centuries.

  • BLKST-263 Sabar: Music and Dance

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Participants will be introduced to sabar music and dance of Senegal through a study of music, dance, language and history. Each area will be taught by professional practitioners of the sabar tradition to develop a sense of how music and dance are used in both traditional and popular contexts. This course will be directed by Prof. Robert A. Bellinger. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science

  • BLKST-299 Busing in Boston- Moakley Archives

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A research seminar designed to give students the opportunity to explore the difficult history of busing in Boston, and develop their research skills by using material on Boston's school desegregation in the Moakley archives. Research will be augmented by discussions with local figures involved in the events of the era. Class time will be divided between classroom meetings and work in the archives with the documents. Students will be responsible for a final project based on their work in the archives. This course is identical to HST 299.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social Science,Humanities & History

  • BLKST-469 Research Seminar: African American Life in Slavery and Freedom- Reconstruction and the Freedman's Bureau

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    To provide students with a deeper understanding of the reconstruction era, this class will make use of documents related to the work of the Freedman's Bureau. This course is identical to HST 469.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social Science

  • BLKST-510 Independent Study in Black Studies

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Independent study in Black Studies

  • HST-100 Introduction to Asian Studies: Culture, People, Ideas

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, the Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Diverse Perspectives

  • HST-101 History of Western Civilization I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys European culture, politics, and society from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Topics include: the Greek, Judaic, and Roman heritage; the rise of Christianity; feudal society in the Middle Ages; Renaissance and Reformation; the Scientific Revolution; and the development of absolutist and constitutional governments.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-102 History of Western Civilization II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys European culture, politics, and society from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Topics include: the development of absolutist and constitutional governments; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; Industrialization and urbanization; nationalism and imperialism; World War I, World War II, and the Cold War; the decline of Europe as a world power.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-110 Walk to Remember: The Freedom Trail

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Begin with a walking tour of the Freedom Trail conducted by Charles Bahne, author of The Complete Guide to Boston's Freedom Trail. Stops include the Old South Meeting House, the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company Museum, Paul Revere House, and the Old North Church. Students will learn the historical significance of each site and its connection to Boston's role in the American Revolution. In addition, they will develop their research skills during a visit to the Massachusetts Historical Society. The course concludes with a guided walk along the Black Heritage Trail through Beacon Hill, home to some of Boston's key abolitionist leaders. *An additional field trip fee applies for various visits throughout Boston This course does not fulfill core requirements.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-115 Introduction to Chinese History and Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Discusses Chinese civilization from its origins to its recent rise as a world power. Spark students' interest in China and enable them to relate Chinese history and society to their lives and careers.

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • HST-121 World History I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history to 1500. Topics include: hunter-gathering, the migration of humans across the globe, transitions to food production, and the development of complex societies based on agriculture. Major early Eurasian civilizations (China, India, the Middle East, and Europe) are examined (alongside their interactions with Inner Asia and the Arabian Peninsula). So too are Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-122 World History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history since 1500. Topics include: the outward expansion of Europe, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of a great-power dominated global system, the two world wars, the Cold War, the Third World, globalization, climate change, and modern social and political movements.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-149 Empires & Globalization in World History I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system, the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages, and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-H149 Honors Empires & Globalization in World History I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system, the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages, and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-150 Empires & Globalization in World History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making, wars, and the rivalry among early modern empires, economic development, the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-169 African-American Genealogy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This seminar will introduce students to resources and techniques in African American genealogy. During the seminar students will explore methods of applying genealogical research to the larger African American and American story by working on an African American genealogy project. Note: This course is identical to BLKST 169.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-181 American Society, Politics, and Culture: Through the Civil War

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys American history from European colonization up through the era of the Civil War. Topics include interactions with Native Americans; slavery; the American Revolution; the founding of a new republic; social and economic developments in the early nineteenth century; expansion; party politics; sectional conflict; the Civil War and Reconstruction.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-182 American Society, Politics, and Culture: Civil War to the Present

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys American history from the 1870s to the present. Topics include the new industrial order; farmer and worker protests; progressivism; America's emergence as a world power; the two World Wars; the Great Depression; the New Deal; the Cold War; post-World War II American society; the Civil rights movement; Vietnam; dissent and counterculture in the 1960s; the women's movement; economic, social, and political changes in the late-twentieth century; America's relationship to a globalized world.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-200 Gateway to the Past: The Historian's Craft

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores history as an evolving academic discipline, a method of inquiry into the past, and a profession. Students learn historical thinking and research skills that enable them to frame a research question, identify and retrieve required sources, and make an argument about the ideas and actions of past peoples and societies. Required for history majors. Offered annually during Fall term.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-210 Traditional Chinese Society from 1800 to 1949

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Focuses on traditional Chinese society from 1800 to 1949. Explains how elements of Chinese traditional culture contribute to modern Chinese identity and everyday life.

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • HST-215 History of the Vikings

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the Viking phenomenon between the eighth and eleventh centuries. Topics include: the origin of the Vikings in Scandinavia and the expansion and impact of the Danes/Normans in Germany, the Baltic region, England, France, and Sicily; the Varangians (Swedes) in Kievan Rus and Constantinople; the Norse in Scotland, Ireland, Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland (Newfoundland and Labrador).

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-216 The Thousand Year Reich: the Holy Roman Empire, 800-1806

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the purposes, ideology, structure, institutions, context, and historical evolution of Europe's most enduring, most important, most influential, and (before the European Union) most inclusive political formation, the Holy Roman Empire, during its thousand-year history from the coronation of Charlemagne in 800 to its dissolution in the Napoleonic Europe of 1806.

  • HST-218 History of the Mongols

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The history of the Mongol Empire, from the emergence of unified Mongol federation at the beginning of 13th century to its dismemberment into independent territories in Mongolia, China, Transoxiana, Iran, and Kipchak Khanate. We will discuss the topological and geographical features of the Mongolian homeland; and the social, economic, and ideological aspects of their lives. The life and the military and political achievements of Genghis Khan will be highlighted, as well as the Mongols' rule over conquered realms. We will also explore through critical discussions the most important historical approaches to the Mongols.

  • HST-221 William Lloyd Garrison in Boston's Abolition Movement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A focus on the life of William Lloyd Garrison, whom Frederick Douglass called, the chief apostle of the unconditional emancipation of all the slaves. We will focus on the words of Garrison, on his support from the Boston colored community, and his role in the national Abolition movement. Garrison's confidence in the power of moral agitation to overcome institutional inertia will be a theme. The views of a spectrum of historians, writing from the context of many years, will raise questions about movement strategies relevant also today.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-223 History of Law

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys the law's historical development, from the uncodified customs of the ancient world, to the first legal code of Hammurabi, to the European legal tradition: Roman law, Canon law, and the Anglo-Saxon common law. We will examine the law's historical development and its role in different historical moments. We will explore modern law and legal institutions; the relationship between law and society in the transition from feudalism to capitalism; the rise of human rights and the rule of law in Western democracies, including the rise of the legal exception (slavery, for example).

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-224 Civil Rights in the 20th Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An exploration of the history of civil rights movements - from the Reconstruction era through the Conservative revolution of the 1970s and 1980s. Special attention will be paid to primary documents written by civil rights leaders and their followers, as well as analysis of secondary material on how civil rights has evolved over time.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities Literature Requirement,Humanities & History,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-233 The Creation of Russia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines Russia, the world's largest country, leading energy exporter, a major nuclear and space power, and a permanent member of the UN Security Council. Topics include: the Byzantine, Nomadic, and West European cultural layers that helped form Russian civilization; the impact of the Mongols; Russia's competition and expansion against more advanced and wealthier foes; Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great's reforms.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities Literature Requirement,Humanities & History

  • HST-234 History of Sports in Boston and the World

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explore the modern Winter Olympics and the development of athletic events such as the Boston Marathon; as well as the history of basketball (invented in Massachusetts)and baseball and their importance to Boston's history. Examine some of the iconic sports figures of Boston, and the statues and monuments made to them.

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • HST-235 History of Sport and the Olympic Games

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explore the History of Boston and around the world through sports, with special focus on American football, association football(soccer) and the World Cup; the development of the NCAA, Title IX and college athletics; the Olympic Games--ancient, revival and modern. Students will also analyze how athletics and athletic events have been commemorated by statues and memorials in and around Boston.

  • HST-237 Medieval Iran under the Nomadic Dynasties

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Revolutionary changes through three crucial centuries of Iran's history (12th-15th), as Iran withstood two destructive invasions by nomadic leaders, including Genghis Khan and Tamerlane. Examines the social and economic changes Iran experienced, and the rise of Shi'ism and mysticism, which all resulted in the emergence of the Safavid dynasty. A multilateral perspective--political, cultural social, and economic--to conceptualize the different aspects of this important period.

    Type:

    Asian Studies

  • HST-238 Reemergence of Iran and Its Medieval & Early Modern History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines many different aspects of political, social, economic, and cultural history of Iran in the two centuries (1501-1722)of the Safavid dynasty. The Safavids raised Iran's culture and civilization to a high level which had never been in its Islamic period. But the Safavids also traumatized the unity of the Islamic world, preventing the Ottomans from prosecuting their military victories over the western world.

  • HST-244 History of the Iranian Islamic Revolution

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Reviews modern Iranian politics with a special attention on the history of the Islamic Revolution of 1979; evaluates the factors which caused the revolution and its impacts on Iranian society, the Middle East, and the world. Among the important topics of discussion will be the role of the United States in Iranian politics (1953-1979); the policies of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (1941-1979); the hostage crisis (1979-1981); the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988); the Reform Movement (1997-2005); and the re-emergence of radical policies under Ahmadinejad since 2005.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt B

  • HST-246 History of Modern Iran

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the contemporary history of Persia (Iran) from the time of its independence in the beginning of the sixteenth century to the present with special concentration on geographical/historical background; social structure, ethnic, religious, and linguistic diversities; Safavid and Qajar dynasties; Anglo-Russian interventions and occupations; constitutional revolution and reform; centralization, secularization and modernization under Pahlavi dynasty; opposition to westernization and Islamic revolution.

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • HST-247 History of Modern Middle East

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the broad historical forces, conflicts and major events that have shaped the contemporary nations of the modern Middle East. Topic include: the emergence of the modern Middle East from the empires of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the age of colonialism; the rise of nationalism; socialism, capitalism; the impact of Israeli and Palestinian conflict on the region; oil, the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the rise of Islamic fundamentalist movements; U.S. policy; and Saddam Hussein's Iraq.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-248 Peaceful Coexistence: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Iberia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys Muslim and Christian occupied territories on the Iberian Peninsula (modern-day Spain and Portugal), focusing on principal events and broad trends, 711-1492. Special emphasis will be placed on tolerance as manifested in the toleration of religious minorities, cultural and scientific interaction, translation and peaceful coexistence convivencia); and on intolerance as manifested through warfare (jihad, crusade), frontier mentality, massacres, forced conversions, the setting up of the Inquisition and the final expulsion of the Jews in 1492 and of the descendants of the converted Muslims or moriscos in 1609 and 1814.

  • HST-255 Films and Contemporary China

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Uses a series of films to demonstrate the changes in people's lives in contemporary China. It focuses on the Reform Era between 1980 and present. The topics include Chinese politics, economic growth, social change, and popular cultures.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Asian Studies,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-261 African History to 1800

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of Africa from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century to give students an introduction to African Studies and a sense of Africa's place in world history. Topics include: the Nile Valley civilizations, West African empires, the trans-Saharan trade, the slave trade, the spread and impact of Islam.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-262 Modern African History Since 1800

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the history of Africa from 1800 to the present and enable students to develop an understanding of issues that affect the relationship between modern Africa and the world. Topics include: the African tradition; the impact of Islam and Christianity, abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism and colonialism, African independence movements, African nationalism, Pan Africanism.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-263 Comparative Race Relations

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Compares and analyzes the history of race and politics in South Africa and the United States from the 17th century to the present. Examines how race as a social and ideological construct influenced and informed political conflicts over land, labor, and social relations in the two countries including slavery, segregation, apartheid, and the struggle to create racial democracies.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE,D

  • HST-265 Comparative Slavery

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This lecture-discussion course compares the institution of slavery over time and across space. Beginning with its emergence and articulation in the Ancient World, the institution of slavery was evident on all of the continents and played a dynamic role in defining humanity and in forming social, economic, cultural, and political formations up to the Modern Era. The course examines the institution of slavery in its many manifestations from nomadic societies to sedentary ones, from kinship-based states to territorial-based ones, from tribal societies to advanced civilizations, from pre-capitalist economies to capitalist ones.

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • HST-266 Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe: 1500-1800

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores crime, law and punishment in Europe in the early modern era (1500-1800). Topics include: the nature of crime in early modern Europe; the purposes and roles of law (criminal, civil, and others); forms of punishment and what law, crime, and punishment tell us about early modern European society.

  • HST-267 Russia in the 20th Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys of the history of Russia and the Soviet Union from 1900 to the present. Topics include: the end of tsarist rule; the October Revolution and the Civil War; Lenin's rule; Stalin and the Stalinist system; the Great Patriotic War; Khrushchev's de-Stalinization; Brezhnev's economic stagnation; Gorbachev's perestroika and glasnost; the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Yeltsin, and the Putin-Medvedev era.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-268 History of the Mediterranean

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe, Middle East, and North Africa.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-269 Early Modern France

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines early modern France (1400-1789), emphasizing the development of religious, political, and legal institutions. Topics include: the emergence of France as an absolute monarchy; the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in France; the religious wars of the sixteenth century; France's role overseas; war and diplomacy with other European countries; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; and the rise of Napoleon.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-270 Revolution! the Contours of Modern Europe, 1610-1815

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores Europe's political, social, and intellectual transformation, from the decline of Bourbon France's L'Ancien Regime, through the rise of the Enlightenment, to the upheavals of the French Revolution and Napoleon's empire.

  • HST-271 African-American History 1619-1860

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the history of Africans in the United States from their arrival in the colonies to the Civil War and the end of legal slavery. Topics include: the slave trade, the development of the slave system, African-Americans and the Declaration of Independence, and the abolition movement.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-272 African-American History From 1860

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of African American history from the end of slavery to the present. Topics include: Emancipation and Reconstruction, Reconstruction and the Constitution, the Exodusters, the Harlem Renaissance, Pan Africanism, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power Movement, African-Americans at the turn of the twenty-first century.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-274 Women in 19TH-CENTURY Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the condition of European women from 1800 to 1914. Readings focus primarily on women's experiences in France and Great Britain. Topics include: the effects of industrialization on the lives of working-class women; working and middle-class women's negotiation of marriage, work, and family life; the rise of feminism, women's greater participation in the public sphere, and conservative reaction to these changes in women's place in society; women and crime; Victorian ideas about female sexuality; the politics of class and gender in nineteenth-century European society.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-275 Women in 20TH-CENTURY Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores,birth control, and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism, sexual liberation, and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and, throughout the twentieth century, women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE,D

  • HST-276 History of Modern Latin America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The development of Latin American states: society, economy and culture, from colonial origins to the present. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-283 The U.S. and Central America 1979-1993

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class studies this international relationship in the context of the global anti-colonial revolutions, the collapse of communism, and the influence of Catholic liberation theology. The course highlights the Nicaraguan revolution, the Salvadoran civil war, the Guatemalan military campaign against Mayan villages, the U.S. invasion of Panama, and the relative stability but great differences among Honduras, Belize and Costa Rica.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-285 Colonial History of Latin America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to Latin America's colonial history through the Revolutionary Wars for Independence. The course examines topics that are relevant to issues and challenges facing Latin American and Caribbean peoples today, including poverty, corruption, human rights, the power of religion, race and identity, the environment, international trade, political representation, foreign intervention, cultural survival, and the exploitation of land, labor and resources.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-290 19th Century America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of the United States from 1810 to 1910. Students study the growth of American institutions, the rise and effects of a market society, westward expansion and Indian affairs, the enlivening of U.S. civic ideals, debates over free labor and slavery, the causes and effects of the Civil War, post-Civil War redefinitions of citizenship, immigration, Progressivism, and the nation's entry on to the world stage.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-292 American Foreign Relations Since 1898

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys the history of the U.S. as a world power. Examines officials' motives and methods, as well as influences on policy in the form of social and economic forces, interest groups, and foreign challenges. Explores public debates over America's role (as well as debates among historians and international relations theorists), and discusses the domestic and foreign impact of America's world role. Major events addressed include the two world wars, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the U.S. recent history of involvement in the Middle East.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-299 Busing in Boston: the Moakley Archives

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A research seminar designed to give students the opportunity to explore the difficult history of busing in Boston, and develop their research skills by using the material on Boston's school desegregation in the Moakley archives. This will be augmented by discussions with local figures also involved in the events of the era. Class time will be divided between classroom meetings and work in the archives with the documents. Students will be responsible for a final project based on their work in the archives. This course is identical to BLKST 299.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-304 Imperial Rome

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Note: This course is identical to HUM 304.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • HST-306 Arab-Israeli Conflict

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Analyzes the origins and the local, regional, and international dimensions of the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab conflict and examines the conflict through the eyes of the major protagonists and the roles played by them from the early twentieth century to the present: Zionists/Israelis, Palestinians and other Arabs, British, Americans, Soviets.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-307 U.S. Race Relations 1877-1945

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    with a focus on the African-American freedom struggle,this class examines the consolidation of segregation and disfranchisement laws, the rise of Booker T. Washington, the NAACP's fight for civil rights, black nationalism, African American participation in both world wars, the Harlem Renaissance, and Depression Era struggles. We will also consider the history of non-white groups including Hispanics, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt A,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-312 Renaissance and Reformation Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the intellectual and cultural developments of the Renaissance, and of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in their social and political contexts. Topics include: Humanism, the rise of the city-state; art, and science; changes in family and social life; the causes of the Reformation (intellectual, social, technological); Calvinists, Lutherans, and Radical Reformers; Counter-Reformation and its political consequences; the Wars of Religion.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-318 History of Sports in America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class will look at the history of sports in America from the era of American independence to the present. This course will examine the various roles which sports has played in American society including entertainment, cultural, social, political, and business.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-319 The History of Black Music in America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Black music has been one of the primary cultural factors in the United States. From the African roots to hip hop in the 21st century Black music has served as an expression of African American consciousness, providing commentary on many aspects of black life. This art form provides commentary on many aspects of black life including social and political. It has also been a major force in shaping the culture of the United States as a whole. As such it provides an excellent window for exploring the history of Black America as well as the history of all America. With the use of texts, videos, and recordings this class will examine the music of Black America in the context and communities in which it was created and performed, and also in relationship to the wider world. Cultural Diversity A

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-321 History of Islam

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Presents a coherent account of the origin and history of Islam since its foundation in Arabia in the seventh century A.D. to the present. Analyzes the terms, events, characteristics, developments, movements, and institutions that have been part of the shaping of Islam. Ideological challenges and impact of Islam in the world today from both spiritual and political perspectives are examined.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B

  • HST-322 French Revolution and Napoleon

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the origins of revolution in 18th-Century France; the outbreak of revolution; the French Republic; the Reign of Terror; the European impact of the Revolution; the career of Bonaparte; Napoleonic warfare, the rise, fall and significance of the Empire.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-326 The Russian Revolution

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the long Russian Revolution (1900-1930), one of the most important events of the 20th century. Topics include: the long-term trends and challenges that helped unleash the crises of 1917-1919; Rasputin's influence at the imperial court; challenges to the new Bolshevik regime; progress, modernization, and similarities to the new capitalist democracies of the West; the status and role of workers, women, and peasants in USSR; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin as leaders and individuals. (Formerly HST 433)

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-327 World History: Selected Topics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Emphasizes the continuities and changes that take place within civilizations; the similarities, differences, and relationships that exist among contemporary civilizations around the world. Special attention given to the evolving conflict between traditionalism and modernity.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-330 History & Culture of Senegal

    Prerequisites:

    Requires instructor's consent to register

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the richness of Senegalese culture and history, from the eleventh century to the modern era. Along with history, students will examine Senegal's culture and customs through lectures, readings, music and film. In some years there will be a travel component connected with the class.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-333 The United States: 1898-1945

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Addresses social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also discussed. Topics include: the labor movement, civil rights, woman suffrage, progressivism, the rise of the U.S. as a world power, the First World War, the cultural and social crosscurrents of the nineteen-twenties, Fordism, new developments in advertising and industrial engineering, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-334 The United States: 1945-1970

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    American history in the decades immediately following World War II. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the emergence of a consumer society, the growth of the suburbs, the Civil Rights movement, the new women's movement, Vietnam, and the political upheavals of the 1960s.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-335 The United States Since 1970

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the transformation of America in the decades since the early nineteen-seventies, taking up social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also emphasized. Topics include: Watergate, the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the end of the post-World War II economic boom, the culture wars, the rise of the New Right and decline of the New Deal order, the end of the cold War, America's growing involvement in the Middle East globalization, the impact and aftermath of 9/11, and the Great Recession of the early twenty-first century.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-336 Fifth-Century Athens

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course offers an introduction to the high classical period of Greek thought. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, dramatists, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Periclean Athens. Topics such as the relationship between democracy and empire, written law (nomos) and natural inclination (physis), and the influence of the Sophists and the Pre-Socratics will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Thucydides, Aeschylus, Pindar, and Plato. This course is identical to HUM 336.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-338 Ancient Greece & Ancient Israel

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of archaic thought from Greek myths of origin and Hebraic accounts of Genesis to Mosaic law and Aristotelian ethics. Major topics include: polytheism and monotheism, Homer's Troy, the pre-Socratic philosophers and early conceptions of the universe; the complexities of desire and identity in the song of Songs and Sappho's lyric poetry; God's covenant with Israel as depicted in Exodus, Samuel, and the Psalms; self-knowledge and justice in Greek tragedy. Note: This course is identical to ENG 411 and HUM 338.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-342 Modern Japanese History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines Japanese history from the beginning of the seventeenth century to the end of the twentieth century. The topics include early modern Japan during the Tokugawa era, Meiji Restoration, Japanese imperialism and World War II, Japan's emergence as the second largest economy in the world.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Asian Studies,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-344 Passages to the Modern World

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Discusses the early-modern history of East Asia, specifically China and Japan, in a global context. It examines the difference between East Asia and the West in their transitions to modern society, whether or not there was a great divergence," and if there was one, what was the underpinning dynamic in the process. This comparative approach usually requires the class to read one book (in English) on Chinese or Japanese history and another one on European or global history.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Asian Studies

  • HST-345 Chinese Civilization

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Discusses Confucianism; the making of an imperial bureaucratic system; conflicts and interactions among different ethnic groups; the Mongolian Empire; early modern Chinese society. (Formerly HST 131)

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Asian Studies,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-346 Modern Chinese History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines modern Chinese history from the sixteenth century to the present. Studies the conflict between the modern state and traditional society. Discusses China's turbulent transition from an old empire to the Communist regime, the dynamics behind this transition, and the price that ordinary Chinese people have paid. Also studies China's interactions with the outside world from the first Opium War to China's entrance to the World Trade Organization. (Formerly HST 132)

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Asian Studies,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-347 Japanese Civilization

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Provides an overview of Japanese history from ancient times o the nineteenth century. Topics include imperial Japan, the emergence of the samurai, and Tokugawa society.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Asian Studies,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-348 Samurai: History, Literature & Film

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Asian Studies

  • HST-356 World War II: the Global War

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the Second World War from political. military and socio-cultural perspectives, connecting experiences of combatants and civilians with issues of total war and shows how global conflict fundamentally altered both the world's geopolitical contours and the consciousness of those who waged and endured it.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-357 History of Spain I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys the most transcendental social, cultural, economic and political developments in the history of Spain from the Neolithic to the Early Modern Period. Examines the broad history of the nation and its peoples and placing emphasis on three central themes: diversity within the Iberian Peninsula, the region's social and geo-political structures, and the transformation of the Old Order of the ancient kingdoms into a modern, nation-state. Topics include: the Pre-historical period, Roman Hispania, the Medieval Kingdoms, Islamic Civilization, the Christian Reconquest, the Catholic Monarchy, Imperial Spain under the Habsburgs, and the Crisis of the Spanish Empire in the 17th century.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-358 History of Spain II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the political, economic, and social history of Spain from 1700 to the present. Topics include: the War of Spanish Succession; the Bourbon state; the Enlightenment in Spain; the impact of the French Revolution; Spain in the Napoleonic Wars; the rise of liberalism, socialism, and anarchism; the crisis of 1898; the problems of modernization; the Spanish Civil War and the Franco regime; the transition from dictatorship to democracy; Spain's international position today.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-H359 The Age of Franklin

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the Instructor required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) rose from relative poverty and obscurity to become one of the most powerful and successful men of his century. Examines the political, scientific, and literary, an diplomatic cultures of the eighteenth century by focusing on Franklin's life, reading Franklin's Autobiography, and selections from his political, scientific, and satirical writings. This is an Honors-level course.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-360 Native America: From Pre-History to the Trail of Tears

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the native people of North America before and after the European conquest. Native Americans' relations with one another and their reactions to the Europeans; European and Native American perceptions of one another; white Indians and noble savages; resistance and assimilation; the United States and Indian removal.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History

  • HST-362 History of Piracy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the historical reality of pirates and piracy, focusing on the Golden Age years of 1650 to 1730, reasons why men (and some women) turned pirate, and why there has existed a continuing fascination with pirates for centuries. Particular emphasis is placed on the interaction between pirates and New England. Students will read primary sources and accounts, secondary sources, and fictional presentations - both books and films - to better understand piracy, why it happened, and why it continues to fascinate.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-365 Presenting History: Media & Methods of Public History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Considers the history, theory, and techniques of public history presentation. Learn what visitors want for themselves and their families when they choose to spend their time at a historic site, historic house or history museum. Modes of presentation covered include film documentary, Web site exhibition, popular historical writing, and reenactment. Students produce a project using survey data and information learned throughout the course about preserving history through media and method to demonstrate what the future of historic preservation might resemble. Note: There will be travel involved to visit various historic sites. Please allow time before and after scheduled class time.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • HST-368 Boston's Historic Houses

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Working with historic houses in Boston, students will learn that art of interpreting history. Using collections, archives, and other repositories, students will research the houses and the people who lived in them. Many of these houses have existed from colonial times and had various uses. Formerly:HST 368 Introduction to Historical Interpretation.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-369 American Objects: Materials, Meaning and History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores American history through material objects - from colonial silver teapots to 1960s lava lamps. Students will investigate an object's purpose, how it was made and who made it, and interpret the object's cultural meanings for American history. Topics covered will include the decorative arts, vernacular architecture, archaeology, industrial design, ethnicity and gender, visual culture, and landscapes. Lectures and discussions will be complemented with visits to museums, historic houses, and other sites. Students will learn how to research and write about material cultures, placing objects or spaces in their historical context.

    Type:

    Humanities & History

  • HST-370 Workers in America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines how ordinary Americans shaped and have been shaped by the experience of work in a capitalist economic order. Surveys the world of work and workers, free and unfree, from 1800 to the present. Topics include changing conceptions of work, formation of workers' consciousness and communities, working-class cultures, movements for labor reform, and the impact of race, ethnicity, and gender on labor markets, workplace dynamics, and working-class families and communities. Explores workers' experiences of industrialization and technological innovation, immigration and migration, consumerism and globalization.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History

  • HST-371 U.S. Women's History Colonial to 1865

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Traces the roles, images and experiences of women in America from colonial times to 1865. Topics include the family, work, religion, education, health care, motherhood, sexuality, social and political activism legal status, labor activism and popular culture. With attention to ethnicity, race, class, age, region of residence, disability and sexual orientation, the course focuses primarily on the everyday lives of ordinary women.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Diverse Perspectives

  • HST-372 U.S. Women's History: 1865-present

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the social and cultural history of women in the United States from the close of the Civil War to the present. Using not only gender but also race, ethnicity, class, age, disability, region of residence, and sexual orientation as important categories of analysis, this course focuses on women's private and public lives. Topics include the family, work, religion, education, health care, private lives, motherhood, sexuality, social and political activism, legal status, labor activism, and popular culture.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-373 History of Human Rights

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the history of human rights from the Enlightenment to the present, including the historical origins of human rights and its evolution over time as well as topics such as slavery, imperialism, women's rights, and genocide.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-377 Caribbean and Latin-American Diaspora

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A look at the migration of people, along with their culture, to and from the Caribbean and Latin America. The first half of the course looks at how European, Asian and African diasporas settled in the region, assimilated and contributed to the ethnic and cultural base of Caribbean and Latin America countries in the colonial period. The second half offers insight into how and why people from the Caribbean and Latin America would later form diasporas of their own in countries like the United States in the twentieth century. Students taking this course will get a sense of the struggles, accomplishments and culture of Caribbean and Latin American peoples in the United States. Formerly HST 286.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-380 History of Plymouth

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Plymouth beyond the Mayflower Pilgrims, Thanksgiving and Plymouth Rock; this course will examine the history of Plymouth Colony from its origins in Reformation England to its absorption into Massachusetts in 1692. Particular attention will be paid to Native Wampanoag culture before, during and after King Philip's War. Students will read primary and secondary sources; investigate Plymouth Colony's material culture through architecture, food, and artifacts; field trips to sites in the Old Colony area will be arranged; and the lasting cultural significance of the Pilgrims and Plymouth will be examined.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-381 American Colonial History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the founding and settlement of North America; the social, economic, and political development of European colonies and their interactions with Native People; the social religious, and cultural world of early America; witchcraft, slavery, and warfare; the British-French struggle for control of the North American continent; and the background and causes of the American Revolution.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-382 The American Revolution

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Analyzes of the background, progress and results of the American Revolution. Emphasis on military aspects of the War for Independence, and on post-war efforts to establish a workable American government; to secure a union and not restrict individual liberty.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-383 Boston: Heritage of a City

    Prerequisites:

    One History course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Boston from its foundation in 1630 to its development as a 21st century metropolis. From the Massachusetts Bay Colony, to cradle of the American Revolution, to a Yankee merchant capital, Brahmin cultural center,and immigrant melting pot. When offered in the hybrid format, this course will meet at the regularly-scheduled time, but lectures and other course materials will be available on the course Blackboard site in case you cannot attend.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-384 History of Boston and Suffolk University

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Numerous walking tours will highlight an overview of Boston's history (its foundation in 1630 as part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony; as cradle of the American Revolution; as a Yankee merchant capital, Brahmin cultural center, and immigrant melting pot; and as a modern metropolis) leading to a consideration of the history of Suffolk University, as product and contributor to Boston history and culture, as well as to its immediate urban neighborhood.

  • HST-389 American Constitutional History I

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Standing Required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates the development of American constitutional government, from the political crisis of the 1780s to the Civil War. The problems of individual liberty versus government power; state rights; race and slavery; war powers; pluralism.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-390 American Constitutional History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the changes in the American constitutional system since the Civil War. Topics include the growth and expansion of federal power; the evolution of segregation; the New Deal; the return of civil rights; the expansion of individual rights; the role of courts and states in the federal system.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-392 American Civil War and Reconstruction

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the biggest war in American History; from the antebellum reform and expansion movements, slavery and the deepening sectional crisis of the 1850s. Analyzes violent war and Reconstruction to 1877.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-395 US History: Race and Ethnicity

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of Instructor Required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    View American history from the perspective of its racial and ethnic minorities. Topics include: Native American efforts to retain cultural independence and to shape relations with the majority; Asian Americans and the model minority myth; African Americans and the Constitution; recent refugees and current immigration legislation.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-396 The African Diaspora

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the dispersion of Africans to the Americas during the era of the slave trade and the establishment of New World communities of Africans and people of mixed descent. Topics include: the Slave Trade, comparative Slave Systems, Religion, Resistance and Revolutionary Movements, Return and Redemption Movements, Pan Africanism, Race and Class. Cultural Diversity A Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • HST-407 German History 1517 - 1871

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the social, political and cultural development of the German-speaking population of central Europe from the beginning of the Reformation to the proclamation of the Second Reich, with major attention to the Wars of Religion, the emergence of Prussia and its competition with Austria, and the development of German nationalism.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-411 Europe, 1815 - 1914

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the political, economic, social and cultural development of the principal European states from 1815-1914. Topics include: restoration and resistance after the Congress of Vienna; the evolution of the rising European middle class; the revolutions of 1848; the effects of industrialization and urbanization; nationalism and imperialism; socialism, feminism, and conservative reaction; Modernist culture and the rise of the Avant-garde; the political and diplomatic antecedents to World War I.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-412 Europe in the 20th Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the political, economic, social and cultural developments of the principal European states since 1900. Topics include: World War I; the social and economic dislocations of the 1920s and 1930s; the rise of Fascism and National Socialism; World War II; the remains of colonialism; modernization and Americanization since the 1960s; the European Union; Europe after the Cold War; and throughout the twentieth century, the importance of class and class conflict, nationalism, and war in shaping the European experience.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-414 Nazi Germany

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines German and European preconditions; the VersaillesTreaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-415 Ireland: Celts to Present

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines Irish origins and medieval background; Anglo-Irish history from the Tudor invasion of Ireland in 1534 to the present will be explored with emphasis on the interrelationship between developments in the two nations.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-417 Czech Cultural History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A seminar in Czech cultural history, especially as illuminated and viewed through Czech literature and philosophy of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-418 Central-European History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the situation and contributions of the principal Central European ethnicities (the Germans, Austrians, Czechs, Slovaks, Poles, Hungarians, and Ashkenazi Jews)and their political and cultural formations from early medieval times until the present. Topics include: the Great Moravian Empire, the Holy Roman Empire, the Czech, Polish, and Hungarian kingdoms, the Austro-Hungarian and German Empires, the Middle European successor states after World War I, the Third Reich, the Soviet Empire, the fall of Communism of 1989, the subsequent transitions of the principal Central European states, and their relations with the European Union.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-426 Politics and Culture in Europe 1919-1939

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the social and political development of European society between the two world wars, primarily through the literature, art, and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women, workers, and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-427 Religion and Society in Europe: 1400-1650

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines organized religion and the personal devotional experiences of ordinary women and men in European society from 1400-1650. Topics include: Catholic liturgy; the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the Wars of religion; heresy and the Inquisition.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-434 The New Europe Since 1945

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the Soviet Union, Germany and their neighbor states, beginning with an exploration of the contradictory genesis of Glasnost and Perestroika in economic stagnation and in the liberation tradition of socialism, the impact of these movements and their related dislocations on the Europe of the late 1980s and 1990s, and their implications for the new Europe of the twenty-first century.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-441 Social Movements in the Caribbean

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A case-study approach to studying the various means by which people in the Caribbean sought to overcome the legacies of colonial exploitation of their land, labor and resources. The course also offers lessons from the case-studies for approaching/achieving positive social change. Students will learn about the people's struggles to improve their social lives, reduce poverty, access land, expand human rights, reduce illiteracy, and gain accountability from their governments through violent and non-violent means.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-452 Ancient China Seminar

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Discusses the emergence of early Chinese states, feudalism during Chinese antiquity, the emergence of Confucianism and other competing political ideologies, and the consolidation of the imperial power.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Asian Studies

  • HST-469 Research Seminar: African American Life in Slavery and Freedom- Reconstruction and the Freedman's Bureau

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    To provide students with a deeper understanding of the Reconstruction era, this class will make use of documents related to the work of the Freedmen's Bureau. This course is identical to BLKST 469.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-471 Self, Body, & Sexuality- U.S. History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines American debates over the natures, capacities, and responsibilities of men and women from settlement of the New World through the present. Emphasis is given to three elements of the self: social and civic personhood, the body, and sexuality. We will focus on representations of womanhood and masculinity - across racial, ethnic, and class lines - and their effects on men and women in society, politics, and at law. Course readings will also examine concepts of human nature and the interplay among mind, body, and sexuality.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-481 Boston History, Literature & Film

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary examination of the history of Boston. Special focus will be on Boston in fiction, poetry, and film, as well as on the analysis of historical documents and accounts. This course is recommended for History and Literature Honors majors. Jointly taught by professors from the History and English Departments.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-483 Death, Disease,Healing-US HST

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health, illness, and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examine interactions among patients, healers (orthodox and heterodox), the medical and scientific professions, business, and government. Explore the effects of scientific and technological advancements, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, war, and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health, and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy, linked to historical relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History

  • HST-H483 Death, Disease, Healing- U.S. History

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the instructor required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health, illness, and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examines interactions among patients, healers (orthodox and heterodox), the medical and scientific professions, business, and government. Explores the effects of scientific and technological advancements, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, war, and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health, and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy, linked to historical relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality. This is an honors-level course.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • HST-484 History of the Emotions

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores ideas about emotional life from the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, and psychology as well as the evolution of emotion rules and prescriptions, focusing on western Europe and the United States since 1700. In the eighteenth century, emotions were seen as a positive influence on politics and public life, especially during the French Revolution. After the fall of Robespierre, the emotions were banished to the private sphere - so we will read both primary sources and recent scholarship on 19th- and 20th- century ideas about masculinity and femininity, romantic love and marriage, childrearing, and about what parents and children are supposed feel toward each other, how ideas about these subjects have changed over time, and whether our feelings change with them.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • HST-494 Politics and Protest

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The impact of organized reform movements on American History from the 1800s to the 1960s is the focus of this class. Themes and topics include utopianism, assaults on injustice, anti-slavery agitation and religious revivalism before the Civil War, attempts to control the behavior of the undesirable groups, problems of industrialism and the working class, progressive political and social reform, temperance and prohibition, women's suffrage and women's rights, civil rights and the counter culture.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-508 Study Trip to El Salvador

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the history of El Salvador through readings, discussion, film, and most importantly, a fortnight in the Central American nation. Our goal is to explore how events ranging from the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth-century, the nineteenth century indigenous uprisings against land concentration, and the bloody and divisive civil war of the 1980s shaped today's El Salvadorans. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature R

  • HST-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An Independent Study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    By special arrangement, members of the History department will schedule seminars or individual discussion sessions with students interested in directed reading and research. Open to Juniors and Seniors with the permission of the instructor.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • HST-522 History Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of instructor required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Require approximately 12 hours of work per week in a history-related position, at a museum, historical society, or archive. Designed to introduce the student to the professional opportunities and responsibilities in the fields of public history or historic preservation. Interested students should consult the instructor in advance. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor is required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • HST-H555 Senior Honors Thesis

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An individual program of reading, research, and writing on an approved topic, under the supervision of a History faculty member. The completed thesis will be at least 20-25 pages reflecting original research. The qualifying student must have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in History classes, must be recommended by two History faculty members, and must submit a writing sample of at least 5 pages to the Department chair by the end of their junior year. Must be taken in the Fall of the Senior year.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • WGS-111 Women, History, & Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the roles and images of women in Western culture and the realities of women's everyday lives through literature, film, history, art, psychology, and recent feminist scholarship. Analyzes gender inequalities and the influence of gender on social structure, human behavior, and artistic expression. Topics include: the social construction of gender and identity; domestic prescriptions for women; women and work; intersections of gender, class, and race in American society; sexualities and identity; the politics of motherhood and reproductive rights; educating girls; negotiating male privilege and structural inequalities; representations of women in Western art and film; and women as artists and gendered models of creativity in art, film, fiction, and science.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Cultural Diversity BFA,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requireme

  • WGS-H111 Women, History, & Culture

    Prerequisites:

    At least a 3.3 GPA required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the roles and images of women in Western culture and the realities of women's everyday lives through literature, film, history, art, psychology, and recent feminist scholarship. Analyzes gender inequalities and the influence of gender on social structure, human behavior, and artistic expression. Topics include: the social construction of gender and identity; domestic prescriptions for women; women and work; intersections of gender, class, and race in American society; sexualities and identity; the politics of motherhood and reproductive rights; educating girls; negotiating male privilege and structural inequalities; representations of women in Western art and film; and women as artists and gendered models of creativity in art, film, fiction, and science.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Cultural Diversity BFA,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requireme

  • WGS-113 Women, Science, & Society

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores women's lives from the perspective of the social and natural sciences, including examination of recent biological, psychological, and sociological theories about gender and gender roles, as well as the influence of feminist scholarship in these areas. Topics include: the social construction of gender; the psychology and biology of sex and gender; women and work; media representations of women; the female body and eating disorders; women's health and lifecycle; women and sexuality; reproduction, abortion, and motherhood; and sexual violence against women.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Social Science,Diverse Perspectives

  • WGS-115 Introduction to Gender Studies

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the key topics and debates that have shaped the field of gender studies, including queer studies, masculinity studies, and women's studies. Through lecture and class discussion of texts from literature, film, history, psychology, and sociology, explores the pervasive influence of gender on the structure of society and our everyday experiences and the role that gender plays in our understanding of love, friendship, sexuality, and even violence. Topics include: biological arguments about gender and sexuality; the social construction of gender and identity; intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality; masculinity and femininity; and theories of sexual difference and the construction of sexuality.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Diverse Perspectives

  • WGS-211 Heroines, Hotties & Hubris: Adolescent Girl's Books

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores what we can learn from the books that teenage girls read. In addition to a wide array of interesting and complex Young Adult novels targeted to young female readers, students will be exposed to theories of adolescent development, literary criticism, and social theory. Topics include how the dilemmas of girlhood have changed or stayed constant and the urge, so common in books for children and teens, to teach kids how to think and behave.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • WGS-311 Engendering Entertainment: Feminism and Popular Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates the complex intersections between feminism and popular culture through several different lenses: by exploring,how feminists make arguments about popular culture; by looking at the complexities of public femininity in today's popular culture, including figures such as Lady Gaga and Katy Perry and television shows like The Bachelor and Grey's Anatomy; by focusing on a variety of articulations of feminism within mass media, blogs, social media, and popular books such as Ariel Levy's Female Chauvinist Pigs, and Caitlin Moran's How to Be a Woman. Along the way we will ask questions about: what makes a work of art feminist; how modern media contributes to or distracts us from a variety of political debates in the realm of female equality and how can we, as individuals, use modern media to create and advance smart, feminist arguments.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • WGS-315 Feminist Thought

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Investigates how feminists, both today and in history, have understood inequality and difference and looked for the best ways to address these issues and bring about social justice. Examines how feminist theorists help us to understand how gender and other social categories, such as race, class sexuality, disability, age and nationality, are constructed within and through each other; and analyzes feminist engagements with liberalism, socialism, psychoanalysis, existentialism, post-colonialism, critical race theory, and queer theory, as well as consider anti-feminist arguments. Readings include classic critical texts by authors including Mary Wollstonecraft, Emma Goldman, Virginia Woolf, Chandra Mohanty, Gloria Anzaldua, and Judith Butler.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • WGS-320 Writing Autobiography

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary exploration of autobiographies by African-American, Hispanic, and Afro-Caribbean writers such as June Jordan, Edwidge Danticat, Cornelius Eady, and other writers including David Sedaris and Lucy Grealy. Students will analyze these texts in terms of language, writing craft and story line as well as writing their own autobiographies, by focusing on childhood memories, high school, and family life. Critical attention will be paid to the role race, class, ethnicity, gender and sexuality play in narrative identity.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • WGS-325 Global Women's Fiction

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores of various cultural worldviews in order to reveal and assess the voices of women from around the world as they respond to important global issues such as sexual violence and gendered oppression. Topics include: national citizenship, sexual politics, legal discourse, aesthetic representation, literary movements, genre, constructions of femininity, sexual identities, and representations of gender in relation to race and class and international cultures, and the relationship of self-image to the body politic.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities Literature Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt B

  • WGS-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An Independent Study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Substantive reading/research in an area of special interest in Women's and Gender Studies, directed by a faculty member in the appropriate academic discipline. Open to Juniors and Seniors by special arrangement with the relevant faculty member and the Director of Women's and Gender Studies. Instructor's permission required.

    Type:

    Social Science