Barbara Abrams, PhD

Associate Professor
Department of World Languages and Cultural Studies

 

 

Phone: 617-573-8284
Fax: 617-367-5965
Email: babrams@suffolk.edu
Office: 73 Tremont St., Rm. 1050

Education

  • PhD, Columbia University
  • MPhil, Columbia University
  • MA, University of Cincinnati
  • Magistère de langue et de civilisation Françaises, Universite de Paris - Sorbonne (Paris IV)
  • Diplôme de pédagogie Française, Universite de Paris - Sorbonne (Paris IV)
  • MSW, Loyola University of Chicago
  • Diplôme Avancé de langue et de civilisation Françaises, Institut Catholique de Paris
  • BA, University of Wisconsin

Biography

Professor Abrams holds a B.A. in French Literature from the University of Wisconsin (1978), a Diplôme Avancé de langue et de civilisation Françaises from the Institut Catholique de Paris (1980), a M.S.W. from Loyola University of Chicago (1982), a Diplôme de pédagogie Française (1984) and Magistère de langue et de civilisation Françaises (1985) from the Sorbonne (Paris IV), a M.A. in French Literature from the University of Cincinnati (1986), and a M.Phil. (1989) and Ph.D. (2000) in French Literature from Columbia University. She has taught at the University of Cincinnati, Columbia University, and Bentley College, served as Head Teaching Fellow at Harvard University between 1989 and 1997, and held a Post-Doctoral Fellowship from the University of Chicago in 2000-2001. Her academic honors include Derek Bok awards for Excellence in Teaching (Harvard, 1993-94), a Mention Très Bien from the Sorbonne (1985), a Michael Reese Sterling Fund Scholarship (1982-84), and an Illinois Institute of Mental Health Research Grant (1982). Professor Abrams’ recent publications focus on the French literature of the Enlightenment, especially the works of Dennis Diderot and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Her book, Le Bizarre and Le Décousu in the Novels and Theoretical Works of Denis Diderot: How the Idea of Marginality Originated in Eighteenth-Century France (Edwin Mellen Press, 2009), examines the background of our modern concept of marginality by focusing on Diderot’s materialist philosophy and his search for the origins of genius, and locating it within the French Enlightenment quest for truth. Professor Abrams also directs the Suffolk intensive French program in Vichy, France.