Major Requirements

Management Major Requirements

The management major consists of a minimum of 18 credits, which include three required courses and at least three elective courses, all taken at Suffolk University.

Required Courses, 3 Courses, 9 Credits

  • MGT-331 Leadership

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 317

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the principles of leadership and the core competencies, traits and behaviors that enable effective leadership. It is an interactive, event-driven program to develop, refine and refresh leadership qualities through activities, individual assessments, coaching, research and dynamic group discussion to practice and develop individual skills. Students will examine various leadership theories, identify styles and preferences, practice conflict management and team building, feedback and expectation setting by applying class room/real world situations to their own learning.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-335 Managing Across Cultures

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 101

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    To what extent are our identities. ways of thinking, and behaving the products of our cultural environments? How do conceptions of motivation, leadership, decision making, negotiation, and ethics differ across cultures? How do expatriates settle abroad, and how do they re-enter the American life they are once so familiar? The purpose of this course is to examine the international context of management, specifically, the cross-cultural environment and how it shapes managers' and work organization members' experiences, roles and responsibilities.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-419 Senior Capstone Project Course

    Prerequisites:

    SBS 101, MKT 210 or MKT310, MGT 317 and ISOM 319. Restricted to seniors.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This capstone course allows students to integrate and apply their acquired knowledge in pro bono consulting projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor, coach and advisor. Course skills to be developed include project management, business communication, and action-oriented analysis. Students analyze real-world problems using primary and secondary research methods, identify feasible options for action, and make professional written and oral presentations to their client organization. An occasional Friday class may be required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Elective Courses, 3 Courses, 9 Credits

  • MGT-301 Managing Change

    Prerequisites:

    MGT-317

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Change is constant in all industries and work settings. Accordingly there is constant demand for people who can understand the need for change, make complex, strategic and realistic change plans, and lead others through a successful implementation of a planned change. This lively case-based course will focus on managerial and leadership skill-building in the areas of change management through the careful and thorough analysis of change-focused case studies. Students will be expected to conduct both individual and group-based analyses of complex business cases; including the preparation of written case analyses, active participation in case discussions, and delivery of case analyses through oral presentation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-302 Developing Innovation Skills

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This highly interactive and experiential course will help you to develop your creative skills for business and life success. Corporate leaders consider creativity [1] to be an essential skill. However, according to a recent Conference Board study [2], college graduates lack the creativity and innovation skills needed to succeed in the workplace. The Council on Competitiveness warns that companies that do not embrace innovation (and creativity) as a core business value will fall to global competition.[3] We will discuss meaning of life issues that will serve to clarify your thinking and help you align your values and belief-systems with what you do on a daily basis at work and throughout your life. A substantial body of evidence indicates that people tend to be more creative when working on projects that interest them, and most creative when passionately immersed in their endeavors. We will focus on enhancing creativity in the workplace to achieve defined organizational needs, to add economic value to the organization, and to create social value as well. We will also focus on helping you to understand and apply a wide array of creative processes and tools to develop your creative competencies and skills. We will use breakout groups, role plays, experiential exercises, and discussions to facilitate your learning. This course is an invitation to you to explore and define what you want to create in your life. [1] The Conference Board defines creativity/innovation as the ability to demonstrate originality, inventiveness in work, communicate new ideas to others, and integrate knowledge across disciplines. [2] Are They Ready To Work: Employers' Perspectives on the Basic Knowledge and Applied Skills of New Entrants to the 21st Century Workforce. 2006. [3] Innovate America: Thriving in a World of Challenge and Change. July, 2004. National Innovation Initiative, Council on Competitiveness.

    Term:

    Summer

  • MGT-313 Human Resource Management

    Prerequisites:

    SOM 101, And Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course includes a study of the modern human resources department in industry with special emphasis on the techniques and methods of management, utilization of people, and contemporary human resource issues and problems.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • MGT-320 Small Business Management

    Prerequisites:

    SBS101 & Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you manage the day-to-day challenges or working in a small business or starting a new venture? This case-driven course covers the role and importance of small business in the U.S. economy, including the application of all management functions to the operation of a small business; human resources, operations, financial, risk and growth. This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-322 Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 317 or instructor's consent, and junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores multicultural diversity in business organizations. In order to learn to effectively manage diversity in the workplace, it is first necessary to become familiar with the concepts and dynamics that underlie many of the organizational issues associated with increased diversity in the workplace. Thus, this course is structured to first study topics such as identity, perception, socialization, stereotyping, and prejudice. With these concepts as a foundation, we will explore the opportunities and challenges created by diversity in the workplace. We will consider issues and dynamics that arise in the workplace as a result of diversity in terms of gender, race, national origin, sexual orientation, and religion. After developing a rich understanding of workplace diversity dynamics, we will consider actions that individuals and organizations can take to address the opportunities and challenges inherent in a diverse workforce to gain competitive advantage. .

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-330 Interpersonal Effectiveness

    Prerequisites:

    SBS 101 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with knowledge of and skills in interpersonal effectiveness. The course is designed to convey the importance of interpersonal skills in today's business climate. Students learn and develop interpersonal skills commonly required of supervisors/managers.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-401 Negotiations

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 317 and Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Junior standing and instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00- 3.00

    Description:

    Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a students marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

  • MGT-520 Management Internship

    Prerequisites:

    MGT-317, Management Major, Junior or Senior Standing, GPA 3.0 or higher, Instructor's permission. Cannot take this course with any other internship course.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    MGT 520 is an internship course which offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in management courses to a valuable work experience outside the University. Interns practice using management principles in a carefully selected real world work situation under the direction of a faculty member, while completing academic requirements intended to integrate theory and practice. Students can also use the internship to explore career interests. Sometimes building a relationship with an employer during an internship can lead to a job offer during school or after graduation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-352 Green and Sustainable Business

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENT-354 Global Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-358 Launching New Products

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-360 Launching the E-Business

    Prerequisites:

    Take MKT-210 or MKT-H210 and junior standing required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This experiential course is an entrepreneurial approach towards developing a real e-commerce business. Students will build off their marketing skills and entrepreneurial ambitions by a) advancing e-commerce ideas to opportunities, b) understanding the product, logistical, marketing, and managerial challenges associated with e-commerce startups, and c) developing financial models to predict and measure performance. This will be accomplished by students developing a launch plan for the opportunity, as well as executing portions of the launch plan.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-436 Managing the Family Business

    Prerequisites:

    MGT-317, Junior standing,

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-301 Business Analysis for Management

    Prerequisites:

    Take MGT-317 and junior status

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with exposure to the business analysis models and techniques generally applicable to common business problems. Using the case study method, the course will emphasize analytical models including forecasting, optimization and simulation within the context of team-based work. Students will understand the process of Business Analysis (BA), the role of assumptions and elicitation, the critical value of hard analytical skills as the foundation of BA as well as the importance of interpretation, communication and implementation to the effective use of BA.

  • ISOM-341 Project Management

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM 310, Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Project management is a critical competence to business performance in contemporary organizations. This course introduces the concepts and techniques of project management, which are applicable to the development of products, services, and information systems. Topics will include project life cycles, project management tools, project process management, and project management practices. Relevant quality management concepts and tools will also be discussed.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

BSBA Degree Requirements

The completion of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree includes:

  • A minimum of 124 semester hours of coursework and satisfaction of all degree requirements;
  • 2.0 overall cumulative average;
  • 2.0 average in major and minor fields of study; 
  • A minimum of 30 semester hours of business coursework must be completed at Suffolk University; and,
  • An overall minimum of 45 semester hours of coursework must be completed at Suffolk University to be eligible to be considered for degree.

Full-time students normally complete their degree requirements in four years. A student may shorten the time required by attending summer sessions. Part-time students normally take five to seven years to complete the requirements, depending on the course load carried.

Students are responsible for knowing and complying with specific degree requirements. Any exception to the Program of Study requires written approval from the Sawyer Business School Undergraduate Programs Office.

General Education Requirements

48 credits

Freshman and Sophomore Courses

  • SU-101 Freshman Year Experience

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    SU 101 is designed to assist in a successful transition at Suffolk University and our unique urban community. Through interactive exercises and engaging assignments, the class will discuss a variety of topics, including academic success strategies, personal goals and self-awareness, and additional areas of relevance for new students. Students will develop the insights, skills and attitudes necessary for becoming a successful student.

  • ENG-101 Freshman English I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course studies persuasive and expository writing in the essay form through frequent writing assignments based on critical readings of class texts and discussions. Students will also compose a research paper and study the process of writing and revising for an academic audience. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENG-102 Freshman English II

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 100 or ENG101 or ENG 103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Further study of persuasive and expository writing through the study of literary form with emphasis placed on critical reading and the revision of academic writing.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-120 Information Technology and Productivity

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to information technology and information systems concepts. Students learn the importance of modern information technologies in the workplace. The course covers technology resources of the digital age, such as computer software, hardware, communication, database and telecommunication systems. Students also learn to increase productivity through the integration and use of productivity software applications, such spreadsheets, presentation software and databases. In addition, students learn the fundamental concepts of database design and relational database management systems (DBMS) such as Microsoft access.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • EC-101 Applied Microeconomics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the organization and operation of a market economy with a focus on how it allocates scarce resources; development of the economic way of thinking. The analysis of the theory of consumer demand and the profit-maximizing behavior of firms; examination of pricing and output decisions of firms under conditions of competition and imperfect competition in a global marketplace. Analysis of markets for labor and capital. Policy issues include price ceilings and floors, trade barriers, competition and monopoly. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • EC-102 Global Macroeconomics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides an analysis of relationships among variables such as inflation, employment, economic growth, national income, and the supply of money. Heavy emphasis is placed on the role of government in setting both fiscal and monetary policy goals to achieve a stable economy. Balance of trade and exchange rates are examined to help provide an understanding of the global economy. Required of all majors and minors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • CJN-177 Professional Communication

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the processes of professional communication, with emphasis on oral presentations, report writing, effective listening, and interpersonal communication in the business environment. Required of all students in the Sawyer Business School.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Math Requirement

Choose one of the following:

  • MATH-130 Topics in Finite Mathematics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 104, MATH 108, MATH121 or appropriate math placement score.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Linear Modeling (for example, using linear functions to model supply/demand situations), graphing, linear programming, financial functions (compound interest, annuities, and amortization of loans) sets, Venn diagrams, counting and combinatorics, discrete probability, conditional probability, Bernoulli experiments, Bayes theorem. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

  • MATH-134 Calculus for Management & Social Sciences

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 104, MATH 121 or appropriate math placement score.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, linear regression, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, implicit differentiation, related rates, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

  • MATH-165 Calculus I

    Prerequisites:

    Math Placement score or MATH 121 with a grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Functions, limits and continuity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; applications(curve sketching, limits at infinity, optimization, differentials); other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Accounting and Finance Majors are required to complete a calculus course (134 or 165) for their programs and may NOT use MATH 130 toward the Math requirement.

Statistics Requirement

Choose one of the following:

  • STATS-240 Introduction to Statistics

    Prerequisites:

    Math 130 or higher.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics include: data presentation, measures of central locations and dispersion, probability and probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression models. The use of Excel and SPSS will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: Math 130 or higher. 1 term - 4 credits (4 hours per week). Normally offered each semester.

    Type:

    Quantitative Reasoning

  • STATS-250 Applied Statistics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 130, MATH 134, MATH 146 OR MATH 165

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

    Type:

    Quantitative Reasoning

Additional courses may satisfy this requirement. Please see the Undergraduate Programs Office for more information.

Globalization Requirement

Choose one of the following:

  • HST-149 Empires & Globalization in World History I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system, the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages, and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-150 Empires & Globalization in World History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making, wars, and the rivalry among early modern empires, economic development, the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • SIB-101 Globalization

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the nature and processes of globalization which define today's international business environment. The course employs a multidisciplinary perspective to explore the growing interdependence of nations in their trade, investment, technology flows, and business operations. Topic include business, geographic, economic, social, cultural, political, and other issues related to globalization. The course is experiential in its approach. Students will undertake a team research project exploring globalization issues with reference to a particular country, region or industry.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

New courses that meet this learning goal may be announced by the Undergraduate Programs Office after they are approved. Students who entered Suffolk prior to Fall 2010: requirement was 4 credits. Students who entered prior to Fall 2010 may need to add a 1 credit course to their Programs of Study if they chose the 3 credit course option.

Any Year Courses

Humanities and Social Sciences Requirement

Select one course from the College of Arts and Sciences Humanities/History requirement options OR the Social Science requirement options OR any course from Modern Languages. See the College Degree section of this catalog for details.

Social Change U.S. and Abroad Requirement

Choose one of the following:

  • CHIN-311 Survey of Chinese Literature & Culture I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is an introductory and interdisciplinary course on Chinese civilization and traditional Chinese literature. It will provide the student with an introduction to the cultural legacy and literature of China from the archaeological origins of Chinese civilization to the period of the mature imperial state in the 11th century (Song Dynasty). The diverse origins of China's civilization are stressed as topics in political, social, and economic history are explored, with a focus on developments in language, literature, and art. This course is a good introduction to further study of Chinese history and culture and, in particular, provides a valuable context for themes treated in Modern China.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

    Type:

    Asian Studies,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • CJN-385 Globalization of Media and Telecommunications

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the development of global media and telecommunication corporations and technologies and the influence these transnational organizations and technologies bear on regional and nation-state communication policy, global and local culture, and the world economy. Cultural Diversity B ECR

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Expanded Classroom Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • CJN-485 Rhetoric of Protest & Reform

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the persuasive strategies of social reform movements with special emphasis on the civil rights', women's rights, and gay rights movements in the United States. Normally offered yearly. Cultural Diversity A

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-203 Women in World Politics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The relationship of women to their political culture and structures. The role of women seen in theory (e.g., Marxism, American feminism, existentialism) and in global comparative analysis. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-420 German Greens and Environmentalism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The rise of the Green Party, from its grass-roots beginnings to participation in the federal government. Background on the development of green consciousness in Germany and Europe since the early 20th century. Present governmental policies and programs (e.g., alternative energy sources, organic farming, recycling, dismantling of nuclear power). Cross-listed GER 420 and ENST 420

    Type:

    Social Science,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-435 Race and Public Policy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 OR GVT 120 OR GVT 223 OR GVT 224

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Public policy's impact on Blacks Chicano's, Native Americans Puerto Ricans, and other minority groups; how public policy has contributed to racial oppression; policies for attaining racial equality; political strategies of minority groups. Cultural Diversity A

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-465 International and Transnational Organizations

    Prerequisites:

    GVT-261

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the institutional structures, political processes, and impact of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. It analyzes their increasingly prominent role in efforts to resolve a wide range of global problems and contribution to strengthen the current system of global governance. While the course covers the problems of international security, global distribution of wealth, deterioration of the environmental system, and threats to social welfare, it focuses on the interaction between the United Nations System and regional organizations, on the one hand, and the role of non-governmental organizations in cooperating or competing to solve specific problems in the area of international relations.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-467 Comparative Social Movements

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class examines the political ramifications o social movements primarily but not exclusively within the United States. It looks at ideology, beliefs and mechanisms of mobilization. Another important focus is an analysis of non-white social movements in this country and their impact on domestic politics. Among the movements to be examined are: the Pan-African movement 1919-1939 which will, to some extent, take us outside this country; the U.S. Civil Rights Movement 1955 to 1969 which covers the rise of the Black Power movement; and the U.S. Labor Movement 1900 to 1955 in terms of non-white influence on its programmatic goals. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-122 World History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of human civilizations from 1500 to the present. Course explores themes such as the development of new trading networks, including the slave trade, religious and intellectual innovation, the rise of nationalism and creation of nation-states, the democratic revolutions, imperialism and world war. We study social change such as gender and race relations; technological and scientific revolutions; and cultural achievements of all civilizations. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-224 Civil Rights in the 20th Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What is meant by the term civil rights? How do civil rights affect notions of what it means to be an American? In Civil Rights in the Twentieth Century, students will explore the history of civil rights movements- from the Reconstruction era through the Conservative revolution of the 1970s and 1980s- to answer these questions, and to try to understand the contested definition of civil rights in modern America. We will begin with the emancipation of four million African-Americans during the 1860s; we will continue through the first wave feminist movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, and the labor movement from the Gilded Age through the New Deal; and we will conclude with the Black, women's, and gay rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s, and their relationship to the rise of the New Right during the 1970s and 1980s. Special attention will be paid to primary documents written by civil rights leaders and their followers, as well as analysis of secondary material on how civil rights has evolved over time.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities Literature Requirement,Humanities & History,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-247 History of Modern Middle East

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course seeks to provide students with an understanding of the broad historical forces, conflicts and major events that have shaped the contemporary nations of the modern Middle East. The course begins with the emergence of the modern Middle East from the empires of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It deals with forces which attempt to meet the European challenge; the age of colonialism; the rise of nationalism; socialism, capitalism, the impact of Israeli and Palestinian conflict on the region; oil, the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the rise of Islamic fundamentalist movements, U.S. policy, and Saddam Hussein's Iraq.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-263 Comparative Race Relations

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Compares and analyzes the history of race and politics in South Africa and the United States from the 17th century to the present. Examines how race as a social and ideological construct influenced and informed political conflicts over land, labor, and social relations in the two countries including slavery, segregation, apartheid, and the struggle to create racial democracies. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-275 Women in 20th Century Europe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores, birth control, and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism, sexual liberation, and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and, throughout the twentieth century, women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-283 The U.S. and Central America 1979-1993

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class studies this international relationship in the context of the global anti-colonial revolutions, the collapse of communism, and the influence of Catholic liberation theology. The course highlights the Nicaraguan revolution, the Salvadoran civil war, the Guatemalan military campaign against Mayan villages, the U.S. invasion of Panama, and the relative stability but great differences among Honduras, Belize and Costa Rica.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-293 Race and Reconstruction: the Transformation of America, 1850-1900

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the political, economic, social, and cultural history of America from the decade prior to the Civil War to the end of the nineteenth century. Students will focus on the political, social, and racial catalysts that led to the Civil War, its aftermath, and the ideologies behind Federal Reconstruction between 1863 and 1877. Through primary and secondary source materials, students will explore the following: What were the long term effects of American slavery, American expansion, and the Civil War? How did different groups of Americans- north and south, Black, White, Asian, Latino- understand themselves, their government, and what it meant to be an American citizen? How did the social structure of white supremacy - epitomized in ante-bellum slavery, Indian removal, and rising anti-Chinese sentiment - contribute to the long-lasting social structure of American racism?

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-306 Arab-Israeli Conflict

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An analysis of the origins and the local, regional, and international dimensions of the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab conflict, this course will examine the conflict through the eyes of the major protagonists and the roles played by them from the early twentieth century to the present: Zionists/Israelis, Palestinians and other Arabs, British, Americans, Soviets. We will also explore the questions of why this conflict has captured the world's attention and why it has gone unresolved since World War II. Finally, we will examine the possibilities and attempts for resolution of what appears to be an intractable human tragedy.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-307 U.S. Race Relations 1877-1945

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on the African-American freedom struggle. It describes the consolidation of segregation and disfranchisement laws, the rise of Booker T. Washington, the NAACP's fight for civil rights, black nationalism, African American participation in both world wars, the Harlem Renaissance, and Depression Era struggles. We will also consider the history of non-white groups including Hispanics, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt A,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-334 The United States: 1945-1970

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    American history in the decades immediately following World War II. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the emergence of a consumer society, the growth of the suburbs, the Civil Rights movement, the new women's movement, Vietnam, and the political upheavals of the 1960s.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-372 U.S. Women's History: 1865-present

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the social and cultural history of women in the United States from the close of the Civil War to the present. Using not only gender but also race, ethnicity, class, age, disability, region of residence, and sexual orientation as important categories of analysis, this course focuses on women's private and public lives. Topics include the family, work, religion, education, health care, private lives, motherhood, sexuality, social and political activism, legal status, labor activism, and popular culture. Course materials include novels and films. Cultural Diversity A

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-414 Nazi Germany

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    German and European preconditions; the Versailles Treaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-441 Social Movements in the Caribbean

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A case-study approach to studying the various means by which people in the Caribbean sought to overcome the legacies of colonial exploitation of their land, labor and resources. The course also offers lessons from the case-studies for approaching/achieving positive social change. Students will learn about the people's struggles to improve their social lives, reduce poverty, access land, expand human rights, reduce illiteracy, and gain accountability from their governments through violent and non-violent means.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-494 Politics and Protest

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the impact of organized reform movements on American History from 1800s to the 1960s. Themes include utopianism, assaults on injustice, and attempts to control the behavior of the undesirable groups. Topics include anti-slavery agitation and religious revivalism before the Civil War, problems of industrialism and the working class, progressive political and social reform, temperance and prohibition, women's suffrage and women's rights, civil rights and the counter culture.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-508 Study Trip to El Salvador

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the history of El Salvador through readings, discussion, film, and most importantly, a fortnight in the Central American nation. Our goal is to explore how events ranging from the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth-century, the nineteenth century indigenous uprisings against land concentration, and the bloody and divisive civil war of the 1980s shaped today's El Salvadorans. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature R

  • P.AD-201 Social Change

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

    Type:

    BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • SOC-326 Protest and Social Change

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An exploration of recent and contemporary protest movements. Cases studied may include Civil Rights women's movement, environmental, militia, and new right, gay and lesbian, labor, etc. Movement issues such as goals, tactics, use of violence, use of media cultural politics, social control and repression will be considered. Under what conditions do protest movements succeed or fail in bringing desired social change?

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

New courses that meet this learning goal may be announced by the Undergraduate Programs Office after they are approved. Students who choose the 3 credit course option should meet with the Undergraduate Programs Office to determine how to best complete the 4th credit for this requirement.

Science Requirement

Choose any science lecture with lab(3 credits/1 credit) OR any 4-credit science course

Business Core Requirements

35 credits

Freshman and Sophomore Courses

  • SBS-101 Business Foundations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • BLE-215 Business Ethics and Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Business ethics is applied ethics. This course deals with the roles and responsibilities of business in a global society; teaches models of ethical decision-making that incorporate multiple points of view, including diverse cultural worldviews and legal perspectives; and addresses those factors that contribute to and constrain ethical behavior in and by organizations. Students will then apply these concepts to current business problems, such as anti-trust, accounting fraud, deceptive advertising, and environmental dumping.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-200 Leadership and Social Responsibility

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Status

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on management challenges faced by leaders of not-for-profit organizations. Through a hands-on team project students will create innovative solutions to a specific organizational opportunity/issue and present these to a panel of external judges. Students will also create sustainability plans so their ideas have life after the course ends. Due to the experiential nature of this course, it will be taught in an intensive format.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • BLE-214 Principles of Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the field of business law including an overview of the organization and operation of the American legal system, including the court system and legal procedure, together with brief coverage of selected business law topics such as contracts, torts, criminal law,and agency principles. Particular attention is given to the ways in which business law manifests important social and ethical precepts.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-201 Acct for Decision Making I

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102; ISOM 120; MATH 130, or MATH 134, or MATH 146, or MATH 161, or MATH 165

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Designed to provide a user of accounting information with the skills to appraise and manage a business. Students are introduced to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Coverage addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

  • ACCT-202 Acct for Decision Making II

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-201

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Enables students to apply the concepts and skills from the preceding course. They learn how to analyze the financial condition and performance of a firm, and how to use accounting information in business planning, decision-making, and control. Relevant current ethical and competitive issues found in the financial press are discussed in the course.

  • ISOM-201 Data and Decisions Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-120; STATs 240 or 250; Math 130, 134, 161, or 165

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to introduce undergraduate business students to fundamental quantitative methods of using data to make informed management decisions. Topics covered include: decision modeling, decision analysis, regression, forecasting, optimization, and simulation, as it applies to the study and analysis of business problems for decision support in finance, marketing, service, and manufacturing operations. Practical business cases and examples drawn from finance, marketing, operations management, and other management areas are used to provide students with a perspective on how management science is used in practice. The implementation of management science tools has been facilitated by the intensive use of Excel spreadsheet models.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MKT-210 Principles of Marketing

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENG-101 or ENG-103;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    As part of the core curriculum for the BSBA, this course provides a comprehensive, innovative, managerial, and practical introduction to marketing. Students will learn and apply basic concepts and practices of modern marketing as used in a wide variety of settings. Technological advances, rapid globalization, economic shifts and cultural and environmental developments are causing profound changes in the marketplace. As the marketplace changes, so must the marketers who serve it. These new developments signify a brand new world of opportunities for forward thinking marketers. In response to these new developments, the focus of this course is on four major themes that go to the heart of modern marketing theory and practice: 1. Building and managing profitable customer relationships; 2. Building and managing strong brands; 3. Harnessing new marketing technologies in this digital age; and 4. Marketing in a socially responsible way around the globe.

Junior and Senior Courses

  • ISOM-310 Management Information Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM 120 AND ENG 102 and at least 45 completed credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the rise of information-enabled enterprises and the role of information technologies/information systems (IT/IS) and e-commerce as key enablers of businesses and social changes globally. The effective application of IT/IS to support strategic planning, managerial control, operations and business process integration in the digital economy is covered. The course also examines the IT/IS related issues of ethics, privacy, piracy and security in the information society.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-310 Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 130 or above; EC 101; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FIN 310); sophomore standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-317 Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102; SBS 101; must have completed 45 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-319 Operations Management

    Prerequisites:

    SBS 101 and ISOM 201, Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this course, students are introduced to the operating component of a service/manufacturing organization where inputs such as raw material, labor, or other resources are transformed into finished services and/or goods. The following OM areas: strategic and tactical issues, product planning and process design, technology management, quality management, capacity, location, and layout planning, inventory management, forecasting and work force management issues are addressed through class discussions, readings and cases. Quantitative models, analytical tools and case studies are used to analyze problems that the business manager would face in both a local and global setting.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SBS-400 careerLINKS

    Prerequisites:

    90 credit hours required.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course is the culminating career and professional experience for seniors. It focuses on career entry and transition, networking for career and job success, impression management concept and skills, and related life-long learning skills. Students articulate and reflect on academic, work, and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers.

Senior Capstone (Seniors Only)

  • SIB-429 Strategic Management

    Prerequisites:

    SBS 101, MKT 210, FIN 310, ISOM 319 and MGT 317. Senior standing required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers and integrates administrative processes and decision making under uncertainty in business areas of marketing, accounting, management, finance, personnel, and production. It also focuses on strategic and policy issues from the viewpoint of senior management in both domestic and international corporations. Case discussions help develop the conceptual framework for analysis and implementation of strategy and policy decisions.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Major Requirements and Free Electives

Credits vary; see below.

Students must complete 6– 8 major courses in a specific area of study. The number of required courses is determined by the specific discipline selected by the student and outlined in that major's Program of Study. The number of required free elective courses is determined by the specific major discipline selected. Students may use their free electives to minor in a business or liberal arts discipline, to earn a second major or to take courses for personal interest. The minimum number of courses and credits for each student’s Program of Study must be met to become eligible for graduation. Currently, the major requirements and free electives associated with each major are:

 

Required Major Courses

Free Electives
Accounting

8 courses (24 credits)

5 courses (minimum of 15 credits)

Entrepreneurship

7 courses (21 credits)

6 courses (minimum of 18 credits)

Finance

7 courses (21 credits)

6 courses (minimum of 18 credits)

Global Business Please see the Global Business section
of this catalog for details.

Information Systems

7 courses (21 credits)

6 courses (minimum of 18 credits)

Management

6 courses (18 credits)

7 courses (minimum of 21 credits)

Marketing

7 courses (21 credits)

6 courses (minimum of 18 credits)

The Business School’s curriculum is designed to enable students to acquire knowledge and skills cumulatively, building from introductory material to more specialized or advanced study in areas of major concentration. Prerequisites have been established for courses that require preparation in order for students to benefit fully from the learning experience.

Students are responsible for taking courses in the prescribed sequence. This means:

  • All prerequisites must be satisfied
  • Students must have satisfactorily completed 54 credits in order to register for upper division courses in the Business School (Business School undergraduate courses numbered 300 or higher, unless otherwise stated).
  • Students must have completed all freshman and sophomore required courses prior to registering in junior-level courses. In particular, students are expected to have completed required English and Quantitative courses before the junior year.

Math Assessment and Placement Policy

Incoming students to the University (who have not transferred in the math requirement) take the University math assessment for placement in an appropriate math course. Students may be placed in prerequisite math courses based upon their assessment results in order to prepare for their Math requirement.

Recommended Four-Year Course Sequence

Suggested course sequences for each business major are available through the Undergraduate Programs Office.

Minors for BSBA Students

The Sawyer Business School offers 12 minor fields of study: Accounting, Legal Studies, Information Systems, International Business, Electronic Commerce Systems, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Management, Marketing and Public Service, Real Estate, and Social Impact.

In making choices about minors, students should consider their intellectual interests and the academic requirements of particular programs. It is expected that students will consult with their academic advisors in selecting a minor.

Minors for CAS Students

The Sawyer Business School offers two types of business minors to College of Arts and Sciences students: (1) the General Business Minor for students wanting a basic understanding and appreciation of business administration and (2) several Functional Business Minors for students who would like to focus on a specific business discipline such as: Accounting, Legal Studies, Information Systems, International Business, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Management, Marketing, Public Service, and Real Estate, and Social Impact.

CAS students interested in pursuing an MBA or MPA should consult with the Dean's Office for custom advising on the selection of minor business courses.

General Business Minor Requirements(for CAS)

5 courses, 15 credits

Required Course (1 Course, 3 Credits)

SBS 101 Business Foundations must be taken before any other business courses.

Electives (4 Courses, 12 Credits)

Select four courses from the list below. Higher-level business courses that are not on this list are allowed on a case by case basis if prerequisites have been satisfied.

Restrictions

All 300-level Business School courses (except MGT 317) require junior status (54 credit hours). All prerequisites must be satisfied. This minor can be tailored to the student’s interests.

  • ACCT-201 Acct for Decision Making I

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102; ISOM 120; MATH 130, or MATH 134, or MATH 146, or MATH 161, or MATH 165

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Designed to provide a user of accounting information with the skills to appraise and manage a business. Students are introduced to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Coverage addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

  • BLE-214 Principles of Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the field of business law including an overview of the organization and operation of the American legal system, including the court system and legal procedure, together with brief coverage of selected business law topics such as contracts, torts, criminal law,and agency principles. Particular attention is given to the ways in which business law manifests important social and ethical precepts.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-110 Do You Want to Start a Business?

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Courses in the 550s are new offerings in Entrepreneurship. Special topics are announced when the courses are scheduled. Prerequisites vary from course to course. Do You Want to Start a Business? This introductory survey course is designed to help students learn about starting a business and assess their personal interest in pursuing such activity. Topics cover the range of business start-up activities from personal assessment to opportunity recognition, market assessment, feasibility determination, financial planning, legal, human resources, and business planning.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-210 Personal Finance

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course can be viewed as a survival guide or a road map to the universe of financial instruments available as well as the basic tools needed to make informed decisions. The course is intended to address the concerns of individuals in determining their financial needs and managing their financial resources. Finance 210 is a free elective only and may not be counted towards the finance major or minor.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SIB-101 Globalization

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the nature and processes of globalization which define today's international business environment. The course employs a multidisciplinary perspective to explore the growing interdependence of nations in their trade, investment, technology flows, and business operations. Topic include business, geographic, economic, social, cultural, political, and other issues related to globalization. The course is experiential in its approach. Students will undertake a team research project exploring globalization issues with reference to a particular country, region or industry.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SIB-321 Introduction to International Business

    Prerequisites:

    Take SIB-101 or IB-101 or HST-149 or HST-150;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    To provide students with an understanding of problems and opportunities associated with doing business across country and cultural boundaries and to encourage global business thinking and strategy formulation. Topics include the forms of international business involvement; economic, social, cultural and political conditions; national and multinational regulations of international transactions and investments; and global strategies for business operations.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-120 Information Technology and Productivity

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to information technology and information systems concepts. Students learn the importance of modern information technologies in the workplace. The course covers technology resources of the digital age, such as computer software, hardware, communication, database and telecommunication systems. Students also learn to increase productivity through the integration and use of productivity software applications, such spreadsheets, presentation software and databases. In addition, students learn the fundamental concepts of database design and relational database management systems (DBMS) such as Microsoft access.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-201 Data and Decisions Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-120; STATs 240 or 250; Math 130, 134, 161, or 165

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to introduce undergraduate business students to fundamental quantitative methods of using data to make informed management decisions. Topics covered include: decision modeling, decision analysis, regression, forecasting, optimization, and simulation, as it applies to the study and analysis of business problems for decision support in finance, marketing, service, and manufacturing operations. Practical business cases and examples drawn from finance, marketing, operations management, and other management areas are used to provide students with a perspective on how management science is used in practice. The implementation of management science tools has been facilitated by the intensive use of Excel spreadsheet models.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-313 Human Resource Management

    Prerequisites:

    SOM 101, And Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course includes a study of the modern human resources department in industry with special emphasis on the techniques and methods of management, utilization of people, and contemporary human resource issues and problems.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • MGT-317 Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102; SBS 101; must have completed 45 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-322 Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 317 or instructor's consent, and junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores multicultural diversity in business organizations. In order to learn to effectively manage diversity in the workplace, it is first necessary to become familiar with the concepts and dynamics that underlie many of the organizational issues associated with increased diversity in the workplace. Thus, this course is structured to first study topics such as identity, perception, socialization, stereotyping, and prejudice. With these concepts as a foundation, we will explore the opportunities and challenges created by diversity in the workplace. We will consider issues and dynamics that arise in the workplace as a result of diversity in terms of gender, race, national origin, sexual orientation, and religion. After developing a rich understanding of workplace diversity dynamics, we will consider actions that individuals and organizations can take to address the opportunities and challenges inherent in a diverse workforce to gain competitive advantage. .

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-330 Interpersonal Effectiveness

    Prerequisites:

    SBS 101 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with knowledge of and skills in interpersonal effectiveness. The course is designed to convey the importance of interpersonal skills in today's business climate. Students learn and develop interpersonal skills commonly required of supervisors/managers.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-335 Managing Across Cultures

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 101

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    To what extent are our identities. ways of thinking, and behaving the products of our cultural environments? How do conceptions of motivation, leadership, decision making, negotiation, and ethics differ across cultures? How do expatriates settle abroad, and how do they re-enter the American life they are once so familiar? The purpose of this course is to examine the international context of management, specifically, the cross-cultural environment and how it shapes managers' and work organization members' experiences, roles and responsibilities.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MKT-210 Principles of Marketing

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENG-101 or ENG-103;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    As part of the core curriculum for the BSBA, this course provides a comprehensive, innovative, managerial, and practical introduction to marketing. Students will learn and apply basic concepts and practices of modern marketing as used in a wide variety of settings. Technological advances, rapid globalization, economic shifts and cultural and environmental developments are causing profound changes in the marketplace. As the marketplace changes, so must the marketers who serve it. These new developments signify a brand new world of opportunities for forward thinking marketers. In response to these new developments, the focus of this course is on four major themes that go to the heart of modern marketing theory and practice: 1. Building and managing profitable customer relationships; 2. Building and managing strong brands; 3. Harnessing new marketing technologies in this digital age; and 4. Marketing in a socially responsible way around the globe.

  • P.AD-321 Foundations of Pub Organ Admin

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides an overview of public administration and service and serves as the basis for advanced studies in the MPA program. This course covers the structure, functions, and processes of public service organizations at various levels, including governments and nonprofit organizations. Students explore historical trends, ethical considerations, and political rationale for the present operations of public service.

  • P.AD-322 Organizational Change

    Prerequisites:

    Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students explore small groups and organizational operations, practices, behaviors, and structure. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of the Classicists; leadership; organizational development; and results-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation, and change.

  • P.AD-325 Nonprofit Management

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

  • P.AD-326 Public Service Information Based Management

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course demonstrates how issues, problems and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

  • P.AD-361 Public Service Human Resource Management

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Functional Business Minors for CAS Students

4–6 courses, 12–18 credits

In general, College of Arts and Sciences students may undertake a functional business minor when they have achieved junior standing and have completed SBS 101. Many of the courses require prerequisites. Please review the appropriate business department section for functional minor requirements.