Undergraduate

Course descriptions may be updated periodically to reflect changes since the last published catalog.
  • ENT-101 Business Foundations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H101 Business Foundations

    Prerequisites:

    GPA of 3.3 or above required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-110 Do You Want to Start a Business?

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Courses in the 550s are new offerings in Entrepreneurship. Special topics are announced when the courses are scheduled. Prerequisites vary from course to course. Do You Want to Start a Business? This introductory survey course is designed to help students learn about starting a business and assess their personal interest in pursuing such activity. Topics cover the range of business start-up activities from personal assessment to opportunity recognition, market assessment, feasibility determination, financial planning, legal, human resources, and business planning.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-280 Opportunity Recognition and Discovery

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 101;Sophomore StandinG. For sections designated for ENT majors and minors only, only ENT majors and minors may enroll in those sections. For sections designated for Non-ENT majors and minors, ENT majors and minors are not allowed.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Ever wonder how entrepreneurs get their ideas? In this course, you will learn a deliberate process of opportunity recognition and discovery. You will learn how to generate ideas taking into consideration rarity, value, and your entrepreneurial fit. Through this process, you will gain an understanding or your knowledge, skills and abilities intended to improve the likelihood of success. Once your opportunity is identified, you will determine the feasibility of its feasibility from concept to an industry and competitive analysis.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-300 Legal and Financial Risk With Startups

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 201 AND ENT 280.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Expand upon your feasibility plan from ENT 280, or identify a new opportunity, and learn about the financial and legal considerations that need to be addressed to determine whether or not your opportunity is a go or no go with respect to moving your opportunity forward towards business plan development. Legal topics include: business organization, employment practices, taxation and independent contractors, intellectual property, contracts and governance. Financial topics include: verifying the business model and related cost structure, making credible assumptions, preparing forecast financial statements, all leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H300 Legal and Financial Risk With Startups

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Expand upon your feasibility plan from ENT 280, or identify a new opportunity, and learn about the financial and legal considerations that need to be addressed to determine whether or not your opportunity is a go or no go with respect to moving your opportunity forward towards business plan development. Legal topics include: business organization, employment practices, taxation and independent contractors, intellectual property, contracts and governance. Financial topics include: verifying the business model and related cost structure, making credible assumptions, preparing forecast financial statements, all leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

  • ENT-315 Entrepreneurial Skills

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 280 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Knowledge of business alone, or having an idea, is not sufficient for the entrepreneur. You must also learn how to manage yourself and others as you prepare for you first day of business. This course is designed to provide you with the knowledge and skills to build and lead a startup or growing organization through lessons and experiential team projects. Skills covered in this course include: self management, negotiations, networking, sales, conflict/collaboration, and teams.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H315 Honors Entrepreneurial Skills

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENT-280 or ENT-H280; GPA of 3.3 or higher

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Knowledge of business alone, or having an idea, is not sufficient for the entrepreneur. You must also learn how to manage yourself and others as you prepare for you first day of business. This course is designed to provide you with the knowledge and skills to build and lead a startup or growing organization through lessons and experiential team projects. Skills covered in this course include: self management, negotiations, networking, sales, conflict/collaboration, and teams.

  • ENT-320 Small Business Management

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you manage the day-to-day challenges or working in a small business or starting a new venture? This case-driven course covers the role and importance of small business in the U.S. economy, including the application of all management functions to the operation of a small business; human resources, operations, financial, risk and growth. This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H320 Honors- Small Business Management

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you manage the day-to-day challenges or working in a small business or starting a new venture? This case-driven course covers the role and importance of small business in the U.S. economy, including the application of all management functions to the operation of a small business; human resources, operations, financial, risk and growth. This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-326 Writing the Business Plan

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 300, ACCT 201, ACCT 202 and Junior Standing.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Use your knowledge from your entrepreneurship courses and experience up to this point to create a viable business plan that will lend credibility to the viability of your potential audience, which may include investors, financial institutions, suppliers, family or friends. In this course, you will write a business plan that shapes your opportunity into a model that resembles a venture. You will then defend the plan addressing the venture's business model, management team, organization, customers, markets, competitors, operations and risk, all leading to financials that will determine the amount of capital you will need, as well as financing alternatives.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H326 Writing the Business Plan

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENT-300 ACCT-201 ACCT-202;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Use your knowledge from your entrepreneurship courses and experience up to this point to create a viable business plan that will lend credibility to the viability of your potential audience, which may include investors, financial institutions, suppliers, family or friends. In this course, you will write a business plan that shapes your opportunity into a model that resembles a venture. You will then defend the plan addressing the venture's business model, management team, organization, customers, markets, competitors, operations, and risk, all leading to financials that will determine the amount of capital you will need, as well as financing alternatives.

  • ENT-350 Social Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ENT-H350 Social Entrepreneurship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-352 Green and Sustainable Business

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENT-354 Global Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-358 Launching New Products

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-360 Launching the E-Business

    Prerequisites:

    Take MKT-210 or MKT-H210 and junior standing required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This experiential course is an entrepreneurial approach towards developing a real e-commerce business. Students will build off their marketing skills and entrepreneurial ambitions by a) advancing e-commerce ideas to opportunities, b) understanding the product, logistical, marketing, and managerial challenges associated with e-commerce startups, and c) developing financial models to predict and measure performance. This will be accomplished by students developing a launch plan for the opportunity, as well as executing portions of the launch plan.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-362 Legal and Ethical Issues in Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    Take BLE-214 or BLE-H214; junior standing required

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you protect yourself, your venture, and your intellectual property when starting a new business? In this course, you will learn the substantive areas of the law that are essential to entrepreneurs and an integration of that knowledge with ethics. Specifically, you will gain a stronger understanding of a) how to select a law firm that best fits the startup and b) how to protect your intellectual property through the use of trademarks, copyrights, patents, trade secrets, non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements. You will also learn how startups can protect their interests through the use of organizational structures and related equity restrictions and employment agreements. From the ethics standpoint, this course will focus on corporate governance and the importance of a management leading an ethical culture. We will examine substantive areas of the law that create legal risk and point to ethical issues within an organization. An important element for the entrepreneur is communication skills; therefore this course will have a major writing assignment along with a speaking requirement.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-366 Starting and Managing a Restaurant

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Do you want to start or manage a restaurant? The restaurant industry is highly competitive with high turnover. The challenges are tough enough when you understand the business, however, too many entrepreneurs who start or many restaurants lack the necessary experience. This course will help you understand the crucial elements of launching or managing a restaurant, including: business organization, funding, location, market analysis, lease v. buy, facility layout, professional resources, licensing, human resources, technology, purchasing, advertising, insurance, record-keeping, and expansion.

  • ENT-419 E-Project Opportunity

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101, MKT 210, FIN 200, MGT 217, ISOM 319, ENT 315, ENT 326 and Senior Standing.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Before you launch your venture, our capstone course gives you an opportunity to assess and consult with other startups through the eyes of their founders. This course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial majors develop and practice their business skills working with real startups and small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course is a transition from student to professional under the supervision of a faculty member who serves as a coach and advisor. Students will learn to interview client organizations, assess the current business, negotiate a statement of work, and develop a project management plan that leads to the consultant-client negotiated deliverable(s). Depending on the client organization, this course will most likely include visiting the client location.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENT-H419 E-Project Opportunity

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 101 MKT 210 FIN 310 MGT 317 ISOM 319 ENT 315 ENT 326

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This capstone course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial majors develop and practice their business skills working with real startups or small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course is a transition from student to professional under the supervision of a faculty member, coach and advisor. Students will learn to assess client situations, develop alternatives and identify and defend solutions, at times within the client organization. Prerequisites: SOM 101 or MGT 101, MKT 210 or MKT 310, FIN 310, MGT 317, ISOM 319, ENT 315, ENT 326 and Senior standing. 1 term - 3 credits.

  • ENT-436 Managing the Family Business

    Prerequisites:

    MGT-217(MGT 317), Junior standing,

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENT-510 Entrepreneurship Ind. Study

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 326 and Senior Standing. Note: This course may be used as an ENT major elective.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you looking for an ENT major elective to help you continue with research associated with your opportunity of venture? This independent study is available to students who are looking to expand on their classroom experience by doing additional research related to their prospective opportunity or venture. Students must draft the statement of work related to the independent study, with a primary focus on solving a problem or problems through extensive research, as well as have an ENT faculty member supervise the student during the study. The statement of work must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the statement of work is completed, the student must attach the statement of work to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-520 Launching the New Venture

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 326 and Senior Standing This course may be used as an ENT major elective or taken instead of ENT 419.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Are you looking for guidance to launch your venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits through an independent study working with faculty and alumni through our Center for Entrepreneurial Studies. Students must draft a launch plan based on their business plan prepared in ENT 326, modified based on feedback received from faculty and judges during the ENT 326 presentations. Students must demonstrate enough evidence to support that the venture will be launched, as well as completing all tasks identified in the launch plan by the end of the semester to receive credit for the course. An ENT faculty member must supervise the student during the launch. The launch plan must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the launch plan is completed, the student must attach the plan to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-553 Global Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing Required

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

  • ENT-555 Launching New Products

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

  • MGT-101 Business Foundations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the concepts and practices of managing profit seeking firms, as well as the challenges of managing not-for-profit and public sector organizations. Students develop an initial understanding of organizational stakeholders, the global, economic, legal, and regulatory environments, ethical challenges faced by management, and the strategic coordination of various internal functions of organizations. Students develop an integrative approach to analyzing organizations and are coached on effective presentation skill, culminating in a group presentation of a business analysis to a panel of outside managers.

  • MGT-200 Leadership and Social Responsibility

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Status

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on management challenges faced by leaders of not-for-profit organizations. Through a hands-on team project students will create innovative solutions to a specific organizational opportunity/issue and present these to a panel of external judges. Students will also create sustainability plans so their ideas have life after the course ends. Due to the experiential nature of this course, it will be taught in an intensive format.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-217 Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); WRI 102 (formerly ENG 102) or WRI 103 (formerly ENG 103) or SBS 220

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-H217 Honors in Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); WRI 102 (formerly ENG 102); completed 45 or more credits; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • MGT-301 Managing Change

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Change is constant in all industries and work settings. Accordingly there is constant demand for people who can understand the need for change, make complex, strategic and realistic change plans, and lead others through a successful implementation of a planned change. This lively case-based course will focus on managerial and leadership skill-building in the areas of change management through the careful and thorough analysis of change-focused case studies. Students will be expected to conduct both individual and group-based analyses of complex business cases; including the preparation of written case analyses, active participation in case discussions, and delivery of case analyses through oral presentation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-302 Developing Innovation Skills

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This highly interactive and experiential course will help you to develop your creative skills for business and life success. Corporate leaders consider creativity [1] to be an essential skill. However, according to a recent Conference Board study [2], college graduates lack the creativity and innovation skills needed to succeed in the workplace. The Council on Competitiveness warns that companies that do not embrace innovation (and creativity) as a core business value will fall to global competition.[3] We will discuss meaning of life issues that will serve to clarify your thinking and help you align your values and belief-systems with what you do on a daily basis at work and throughout your life. A substantial body of evidence indicates that people tend to be more creative when working on projects that interest them, and most creative when passionately immersed in their endeavors. We will focus on enhancing creativity in the workplace to achieve defined organizational needs, to add economic value to the organization, and to create social value as well. We will also focus on helping you to understand and apply a wide array of creative processes and tools to develop your creative competencies and skills. We will use breakout groups, role plays, experiential exercises, and discussions to facilitate your learning. This course is an invitation to you to explore and define what you want to create in your life. [1] The Conference Board defines creativity/innovation as the ability to demonstrate originality, inventiveness in work, communicate new ideas to others, and integrate knowledge across disciplines. [2] Are They Ready To Work: Employers' Perspectives on the Basic Knowledge and Applied Skills of New Entrants to the 21st Century Workforce. 2006. [3] Innovate America: Thriving in a World of Challenge and Change. July, 2004. National Innovation Initiative, Council on Competitiveness.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Creativity and Innovation

  • MGT-H302 Honors Creativity for Business and Life Success

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This highly interactive and experiential course will help you to develop your creative skills for business and life success. Corporate leaders consider creativity [1] to be an essential skill for the twenty-first century workforce. However, according to a recent Conference Board study [2], college graduates lack the creativity and innovation skills needed to succeed in the workplace. The Council on Competitiveness warns that companies that do not embrace innovation (and creativity) as a core business value will fall to global competition.[3] We will discuss profoundly important meaning of life issues that will serve to clarify your thinking and help you align your values and belief-systems with what you do on a daily basis at work and throughout your life. A substantial body of evidence indicates that people tend to be more creative when working on projects that interest them, and most creative when passionately immersed in their endeavors. We will focus on enhancing creativity in the workplace to achieve defined organizational needs, to add economic value to the organization, and to create social value as well. We will also focus on helping you to understand and apply a wide array of creative processes and tools to develop your creative competencies and skills. We will use breakout groups, role plays, experiential exercises, and discussions to facilitate your learning. Since we assume that your life is a work of art and you are the artist, this course is an invitation to you to explore and define what you want to create in your life. [1] The Conference Board defines creativity/innovation as the ability to demonstrate originality, inventiveness in work, communicate new ideas to others, and integrate knowledge across disciplines. [2] Are They Ready To Work: Employers' Perspectives on the Basic Knowledge and Applied Skills of New Entrants to the 21st Century Workforce. 2006. [3] Innovate America: Thriving in a World of Challenge and Change. July, 2004. Nation

    Term:

    Occasional

  • MGT-313 Human Resource Management

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course includes a study of the modern human resources department in industry with special emphasis on the techniques and methods of management, utilization of people, and contemporary human resource issues and problems.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • MGT-317 Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    WRI 102 WRI 103 or SBS 220; SBS 101; must have completed 45 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-H317 Honors in Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102,SOM 101 or MGT 101, must have completed 45 credits Honors section, GPA of 3.2 or higher

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • MGT-320 Small Business Management

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do you manage the day-to-day challenges or working in a small business or starting a new venture? This case-driven course covers the role and importance of small business in the U.S. economy, including the application of all management functions to the operation of a small business; human resources, operations, financial, risk and growth. This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-322 Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317) or Instructor's consent required; Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores multicultural diversity in business organizations. In order to learn to effectively manage diversity in the workplace, it is first necessary to become familiar with the concepts and dynamics that underlie many of the organizational issues associated with increased diversity in the workplace. Thus, this course is structured to first study topics such as identity, perception, socialization, stereotyping, and prejudice. With these concepts as a foundation, we will explore the opportunities and challenges created by diversity in the workplace. We will consider issues and dynamics that arise in the workplace as a result of diversity in terms of gender, race, national origin, sexual orientation, and religion. After developing a rich understanding of workplace diversity dynamics, we will consider actions that individuals and organizations can take to address the opportunities and challenges inherent in a diverse workforce to gain competitive advantage. .

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-325 Career & Life Planning for Management

    Prerequisites:

    SOM 101 or MGT 101 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course will provide an opportunity for students to develop self-awareness, personal skills and background knowledge necessary for successful personal life/career planning. Students will develop their own life/career plans based upon materials presented in this course. In a similar manner, attention will also be given to the careers of subordinates. This course is designed primarily for seniors; however, students with junior status may be admitted with permission of instructor.

  • MGT-330 Interpersonal Effectiveness

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (SBS 101) and Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with knowledge of and skills in interpersonal effectiveness. The course is designed to convey the importance of interpersonal skills in today's business climate. Students learn and develop interpersonal skills commonly required of supervisors/managers.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-331 Leadership

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the principles of leadership and the core competencies, traits and behaviors that enable effective leadership. It is an interactive, event-driven program to develop, refine and refresh leadership qualities through activities, individual assessments, coaching, research and dynamic group discussion to practice and develop individual skills. Students will examine various leadership theories, identify styles and preferences, practice conflict management and team building, feedback and expectation setting by applying class room/real world situations to their own learning.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-332 Workplace Conflict

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Conflict in the workplace can be an opportunity for productivity and relationship building or an upsetting emotional situation which hinders organizational effectiveness. By beginning with the causes and sources of workplace conflict which include personal differences, information deficiencies, role incompatibility, and environmental stress, this mini course will cover a collaborative and situational approach to managing workplace conflict. 1 credit.

  • MGT-333 Bldg. a Positive Organization

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    From store or restaurant managers to regional directors to executives of large corporations, you as a leader must learn how to create a positive work environment for your employees so that they can flourish, become resilient in the face of adversity, and achieve extraordinary performance. In this course, you will learn concepts fundamental to building a positive culture, such as social learning, reciprocity, supportive communication, and forgiveness, gratitude and compassion. These concepts will then be applied to a variety of management issues, such as building core values and mission statements, designing a standardized hiring process, creating a sustainable training and staff development program, developing onboarding experiences, enhancing organizational communication, conducting performance evaluations and critical conversations, and managing organizational change.

  • MGT-H333 Building a Positive Organization

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    From store or restaurant managers to regional directors to executives of large corporations, you as a leader must learn how to create a positive work environment for your employees so that they can flourish, become resilient in the face of adversity, and achieve extraordinary performance. In this course, you will learn concepts fundamental to building a positive culture, such as social learning, reciprocity, supportive communication, and forgiveness, gratitude and compassion. These concepts will then be applied to a variety of management issues, such as building core values and mission statements, designing a standardized hiring process, creating a sustainable training and staff development program, developing onboarding experiences, enhancing organizational communication, conducting performance evaluations and critical conversations, and managing organizational change.

  • MGT-334 Introduction to Business Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the core functions and skills required to be a Business Analyst, an agent of change using a systematic approach to add value within an organization. Students will learn how to understand business needs and perspectives in order to develop effective and focused solutions to problems across the Business Solutions Life Cycle, from strategy through to operational results. Using case studies and exercises, this course provides an overview of business analysis, introduces key skills such as project definition, the role of assumptions, critical analytical skills, interpretation of information, communication and implementation.

  • MGT-335 Managing Across Cultures

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    To what extent are our identities. ways of thinking, and behaving the products of our cultural environments? How do conceptions of motivation, leadership, decision making, negotiation, and ethics differ across cultures? How do expatriates settle abroad, and how do they re-enter the American life they are once so familiar? The purpose of this course is to examine the international context of management, specifically, the cross-cultural environment and how it shapes managers' and work organization members' experiences, roles and responsibilities.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-401 Negotiations

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-H401 Honors Analytical Skills

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • MGT-419 Senior Capstone Project Course

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); MKT 210; MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); ISOM 319; Management Majors and Minors only with 90 or more credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This capstone course allows students to integrate and apply their acquired knowledge in pro bono consulting projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor, coach and advisor. Course skills to be developed include project management, business communication, and action-oriented analysis. Students analyze real-world problems using primary and secondary research methods, identify feasible options for action, and make professional written and oral presentations to their client organization. An occasional Friday class may be required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-429 Strategic Management

    Prerequisites:

    SOM 101 or MGT 101, MKT 310, FIN 310, ISOM 319 and MGT 317

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers and integrates administrative processes and decision making under uncertainty in business areas of marketing, accounting, management, finance, personnel, and production. It also focuses on strategic and policy issues from the viewpoint of senior management in both domestic and international corporations. Case discussions help develop the conceptual framework for analysis and implementation of strategy and policy decisions. Prerequisites: MGT 101 (formerly SOM 101), FIN 310, MKT 210 (formerly MKT 310), MGT 317 and ISOM 319. Restricted to seniors.

  • MGT-H429 Honors Strategic Management

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 310;MKT 310;MGT 317;SOM 101 or MGT 101;ISOM 319; SR standing; Honors section; GPA 3.2

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers and integrates administrative processes and decision-making under uncertainty in business areas of marketing, accounting, management, finance, personnel, and production. It also focus- es on strategic and policy issues from the view- point of senior management in both domestic and international corporations. Case discussions help develop the conceptual framework for analysis and implementation of strategy and policy decisions. Prerequisites: FIN 310, MKT 310, MGT 317, SOM 101 or MGT 101, ISOM 319 Senior standing; Honors section, GPA 3.2 and higher. 1 term - 3 credits.

  • MGT-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Junior standing and instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00- 3.00

    Description:

    Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

  • MGT-520 Management Internship

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Management Major; Junior or Senior standing; 3.0 GPA; Instructor consent required; Cannot take this course concurrent with any other internship course

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    MGT 520 is an internship course which offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in management courses to a valuable work experience outside the University. Interns practice using management principles in a carefully selected real world work situation under the direction of a faculty member, while completing academic requirements intended to integrate theory and practice. Students can also use the internship to explore career interests. Sometimes building a relationship with an employer during an internship can lead to a job offer during school or after graduation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Graduate

  • MGES-800 Business Startups

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this introductory course you will learn a deliberate process of opportunity recognition. You will learn how to generate ideas that fit within your and your team's mindset, as well as your knowledge, skills and abilities intended to improve the likelihood of success. Once your opportunity is identified, you will determine its level of feasibility from the conceptual stage, industry and competitive analysis, through legal and financial risk areas, leading to a go or no go decision. Topics include the individual and team mindset, identifying, growing and seizing opportunities, the founder and the team, and growth strategies. Financial topics include verifying the cost structure, making credible assumptions, identifying financial needs and sources, and preparing forecast financial statements, leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-802 Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship, including opportunity recognition, selling an idea, turning ideas into action, developing metrics for venture success and strategies for aligning corporate entrepreneurial projects with company strategies and growth opportunities and managing the conflicts that may arise between existing businesses and corporate entrepreneurial ventures. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship,MBA Strategic Management

  • MGES-810 Social Entrepreneurship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Social entrepreneurship is about applying innovative financial and operational solutions to ameliorating intractable social problems such as health care, education, poverty, climate change and human rights. This course will not only introduce you to the issues and challenges faced by social entrepreneurs the world over, but will also focus on the various business models adopted by social enterprises. The class will be case-based (2 books) with two short exams, one additional book to read, and an out of class project (individual or group--your choice).

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-826 Writing the Business Plan

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Create a viable business plan that will determine the potential of your opportunity to your audience of management, employees, investors, financial institutions, and other potential stakeholders. In this course, you will explore your opportunity deeper in order to prepare and defend a business plan that addresses the opportunity and its effect on a startup or existing organization, all leading to risk-reward analyses that will determine the amount of capital/funding you will need and how you will finance your opportunity.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-832 Venture Capital Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 750 or MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Financing the opportunity or venture is always a challenge for new or existing organizations. This course is designed for students who wish to become in the various financing options such as venture capital, debt, or other financing and bootstrapping alternatives. Students will learn to define the various capital markets and financing options and how each alternative relates to modern financial theory and practice.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship,MBA Finance

  • MGES-842 Global Innovation & New Product Development in Virtual Team

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Corporations place high importance on innovation and new product development for competitiveness and profitability. Since many companies are operating in a global environment, there's a need to find ways to harness the talent of people at multiple locations. This course is designed to teach global innovation and new product development using virtual team and connectivity techniques involving multiple locations/countries, while equipping students with the necessary knowledge, expertise and capabilities towards this goal. This course may also be conducted with Suffolk Law School students.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship,MBA International Business

  • MGES-844 Problem Solving for Small Businesses

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Small businesses are confronted with situations that may have a profound impact on the success and failure of the entity. Too often, small business founders and owners do not have the macro-level understanding of the effect of their decision making process, and that of their management team and employees. Today, small business comprise more than half of all employment and are the growth engine of the next economy. In this case-driven course, you will understand the various aspects of business with a focus on established small businesses and the associated challenges of success and failure. This course will cover the challenges associated with startups, growing and turnaround situations. You will learn how to identify problems and develop solutions that confront small businesses through case analysis, presentation, and assessment where you will have the opportunity to analyze a situation as manage, owner, investor, or other stakeholders.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-848 Green and Sustainable Business

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980s, many firms have learned that improved environmental performance can save money and create competitive advantage. Much of the focus over the last 30 years has been on larger businesses. But now the big businesses are encouraging their small and mid-sized enterprises vendors and partners to pay attention to these concerns also. Consequently, the greening of Small Business is of utmost importance as many small businesses are a part of the supply chains of larger companies. And improving their performance can strengthen the business relationships of all parties by becoming cleaner, greener and sustainable businesses. This course will cover all aspects of green and sustainable business from innovation to new products to greening of the supply chain. It will cover how small and large businesses like General Electric, General Motors and others are paying attention to this very critical topic and taking actions which benefit the environment as well as their bottom lines and thus creating entrepreneurial opportunities in this growing market.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-890 E-Project Practicum

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This advanced course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial-minded students, managers, etc. develop and practice their business skills working with real startups or small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course will be under the supervision of a faculty member, coach and advisor. Students will learn to assess client situations, develop alternatives and identify and defend solutions, at times within the client organization. This course is offered as a joint practicum with Suffolk Law School or as an independent study.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-892 Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurial Clinic

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This advanced course is designed for students nearing the completion of their graduate program. Intellectual assets are vital to promoting innovation and creativity in the marketplace. Yet, many firms do a poor job in understanding and utilizing these resources effectively. In this course, students will learn the importance of securing and leveraging intellectual assets in order to achieve competitive advantages in the marketplace. The course focuses on the strategic importance and management and of these assets with particular emphasis on the creation, protection, and leveraging of various intellectual property forms (e.g., patents, copyrights, trade mark/dress/secrets). Concepts will be reinforced through assigned readings and case studies. Additionally, teams of graduate business and law students will work with entrepreneurial and start-up clients under pro bono consulting arrangements for practical, real-world experience. Under faculty supervision, teams will work with clients throughout the semester to offer guidance and provide consulting services in IP and other business related matters. This course is co-taught by Sawyer Business School and Suffolk Law School faculty.

  • MGES-895 Consulting for the Entrepreneurial Firm

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will provide an opportunity for Sawyer Business School students to work together with Suffolk Law School students to learn and integrate basic legal and business skills. Teams of graduate business and law students will analyze an outside small business or startup with client interviews, problem analysis, statement of work negotiation, project management, development of alternatives, recommendation of a strategic solution, including an implementation plan. The client will be an entrepreneur operating in a dynamic business and legal environment. By exposure to real life business client problems students will have the opportunity to operate as business advisors and lawyers. Students will work together throughout the semester on organizational, governance, strategic and related business and legal problems confronted by all business clients. Students will be assigned readings that will enable them to function effectively as members of an advisory team. Those teams, composed of a balance of business and law students, will work throughout the semester with the same client, culminating in managing a client project, as well as presenting a business and legal strategic plan. This course is co-taught by Sawyer Business School and Suffolk Law School faculty.

  • MGES-901 Business Startups

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this introductory course you will learn a deliberate process of opportunity recognition. You will learn how to generate ideas that fit within your and your team's mindset, as well as your knowledge, skills and abilities intended to improve the likelihood of success. Once your opportunity is identified, you will determine its level of feasibility from the conceptual stage, industry and competitive analysis, through legal and financial risk areas, leading to a go or no go decision. Topics include the individual and team mindset, identifying, growing and seizing opportunities, the founder and the team, and growth strategies. Financial topics include verifying the cost structure, making credible assumptions, identifying financial needs and sources, and preparing forecast financial statements, leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-905 Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship, including opportunity recognition, selling an idea, turning ideas into action, developing metrics for venture success and strategies for aligning corporate entrepreneurial projects with company strategies and growth opportunities and managing the conflicts that may arise between existing businesses and corporate entrepreneurial ventures. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship,MBA Strategic Management

  • MGES-906 Global Innovation & New Product Development in Virtual Team

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Corporations place high importance on innovation and new product development for competitiveness and profitability. Since many companies are operating in a global environment, there's a need to find ways to harness the talent of people at multiple locations. This course is designed to teach global innovation and new product development using virtual team and connectivity techniques involving multiple locations/countries, while equipping students with the necessary knowledge, expertise and capabilities towards this goal. This course may also be conducted with Suffolk Law School students.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship,MBA International Business

  • MGES-907 Problem Solving for Small Businesses

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Small businesses are confronted with situations that may have a profound impact on the success and failure of the entity. Too often, small business founders and owners do not have the macro-level understanding of the effect of their decision making process, and that of their management team and employees. Today, small business comprise more than half of all employment and are the growth engine of the next economy. In this case-driven course, you will understand the various aspects of business with a focus on established small businesses and the associated challenges of success and failure. This course will cover the challenges associated with startups, growing and turnaround situations. You will learn how to identify problems and develop solutions that confront small businesses through case analysis, presentation, and assessment where you will have the opportunity to analyze a situation as manager, owner, investor, or other stakeholders.

  • MGES-908 Franchising: Pathway to Wealth

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The overall objective of this course is to develop skills needed for you to succeed as a franchisee, franchisor, or franchising executive. The franchising method of doing business is increasing rapidly worldwide. Many products and service businesses are managed through franchising networks. Consequently, there is an increasing need among franchise firms for executives and entrepreneurs with franchising knowledge, and there are increasing opportunities for people to attain business ownership as franchisees. The course will deal with the important aspects of starting, developing and managing both franchise networks and franchises within those networks. Specific attention will be given to franchisor-franchisee relationship, and how both sides contribute to their mutual success. Profit opportunities, legal considerations, and international aspects of franchising will be discussed as well.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-909 Green and Sustainable Business

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980s, many firms have learned that improved environmental performance can save money and create competitive advantage. Much of the focus over the last 30 years has been on larger businesses. But now the big businesses are encouraging their small and mid-sized enterprises vendors and partners to pay attention to these concerns also. Consequently, the greening of Small Business is of utmost importance as many small businesses are a part of the supply chains of larger companies. And improving their performance can strengthen the business relationships of all parties by becoming cleaner, greener and sustainable businesses. This course will cover all aspects of green and sustainable business from innovation to new products to greening of the supply chain. It will cover how small and large businesses like General Electric, General Motors and others are paying attention to this very critical topic and taking actions which benefit the environment as well as their bottom lines and thus creating entrepreneurial opportunities in this growing market.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGES-910 E-Project Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    MGES 826

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This advanced course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial-minded students, managers, etc. develop and practice their business skills working with real startups or small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course will be under the supervision of a faculty member, coach and advisor. Students will learn to assess client situations, develop alternatives and identify and defend solutions, at times within the client organization. This course is offered as a joint practicum with Suffolk Law School or as an independent study.

    Type:

    MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-810 Emotional Intelligence

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces learners to the concepts of Emotional Intelligence (EI). Learners will assess their own EI, examine how their EI impacts their performance in the workplace, and develop a plan to improve their own emotional intelligence. In addition, learners will study how EI concepts are applied in organizations via their use in selection, training, management development, coaching, and performance evaluation.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior,MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-820 Career Strategy

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 610 or MBA 710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students explore the nature of careers in the new economy. They learn how individual career strategy relates to the business strategy and competitiveness of employer firms. They also investigate possibilities for inter-firm career mobility and how individual enterprise, learning, and networking can influence industrial and economic prosperity.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior,MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-822 Developing Innovation Skills

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This highly interactive and experiential course will help you to develop your creative skills for business and life success. Corporate leaders consider creativity to be an essential skill for the twenty-first century workforce. However, according to a recent Conference Board study, college graduates lack the creativity and innovation skills needed to succeed in the workplace. The Council on Competitiveness warns that companies that do not embrace innovation (and creativity) as a core business value will fall to global competition. We will discuss profoundly important meaning of life issues that will serve to clarify your thinking and help you align your values and belief-systems with what you do on a daily basis at work and throughout your life. A substantial body of evidence indicates that people tend to be more creative when working on projects that interest them, and most creative when passionately immersed in their endeavors. We will focus on enhancing creativity in the workplace to achieve defined organizational needs, to add economic value to the organization; and to create social value as well. We will also focus on helping you to understand and apply a wide array of creative processes and tools to develop your creative competencies and skills. We will use breakout groups, role plays, experiential exercises, and discussions to facilitate your learning. Since we assume that your life is a work of art and you are the artist, this is an invitation to you to explore and define what you want to create in your life.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior

  • MGOB-825 Human Resource Management

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 610 or MBA 710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    For practitioners and students interested in understanding the roles and skills involved in human resources management. The course brings students up-to-date on the role and focus of human resources as well as provides an understanding of the relationship between human resources and other management functions.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior,MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-841 Managing Workplace Diversity

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is to teach specific skills and behaviors needed to manage in the multicultural workforce of the 2000s and beyond. The topics covered will include: (1) the definition and importance of valuing diversity; (2) the changing composition of the workforce; (3) differences between equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, and managing diversity; (4) cultural awareness sensitivity; (5) management strategies for dealing with workforce changes; and (6) international as well as domestic cultural differences. The issues are demonstrated through a series of exercises, videos, and cases.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior

  • MGOB-850 Management Consulting

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-610 OR MBA-710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In recent years, the practice of management consulting has been expanding because of the growing complexity and specialization of management problems. Whether internal or external, the consultant serves a valuable role by facilitating organization advancement and renewal in addition to providing a detached perspective to the complex problems that face organizations. This course has a dual focus, examining the ways the prospective consultant can develop successful client relationships and develop his or her intervention skills, and the ways organizations can optimize the use of management consultants.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior,MBA Strategic Management,MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-855 Conflict & Negotiation

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course emphasizes the theory and skills of win-win negotiation. Students assess their own negotiation styles, analyze the process of negotiation, and apply theory-based skills for integrating problem solving approaches to negotiation. The course utilizes a mix of teaching tools, including readings, lectures, cases, exercises, videotapes, and role-playing.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior,MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-860 Leadership and Team Building

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 610 or MBA 710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course takes multiple approaches to the exploration of leadership. Emphasis is put on individual self-awareness as a critical precursor to leadership success. A wide range of activities, exercises, cases, and simulations are used to develop understanding of the dynamics of leadership. Team building, both as an activity and a topic for study, is used as the model to develop, practice, and improve individual leadership skills.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior

  • MGOB-865 Leading Change

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 610 or MBA 710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this applied and experiential course, students will learn how to lead change efforts by collaborating with a community organization to address a change dilemma(s) they face. To do this, we will explore the defining conceptual frameworks of change management. We will examine the dynamics of envisioning change, assessing the need for change, developing intervention strategies, implementation considerations, understanding and managing resistance, and assessing the impact of change on the organization, its members, and other key stakeholders. In addition, students will learn, apply, and receive constructive feedback on their application of the methods and technologies used in the practice of leading change agents through service learning in community organizations. They will frame organizational issues and identify how to enter into, diagnose, and intervene in dynamic organizational settings.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior,MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-866 Managing Failure for Success

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course brings to light one of the most important yet vastly unmentionable topics of management: Failure. We will examine various aspects of failure from a sense making perspective at the organizational and individual levels, within emphasis on the latter. Examples of course questions include: What is failure? How do I usually handle it? Can I change if I want to? How? We will adopt an action learning pedagogical perspective so that students may enjoy the difference between mere knowing and understanding of material, on the one hand, and acting upon their understanding, on the other hand, to detect and possibly correct their frameworks for personal groundings, meaning-making, and failure handling strategies. There are no formal academic prerequisites for the course, except a desire for personal mastery and a white belt mentality.

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior,MBA Entrepreneurship

  • MGOB-910 Independent Directed Study

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Independent study in Organizational Behavior

    Type:

    MBA Organizational Behavior