Students meeting for IP Clinic

As part of Suffolk's robust experiential learning offerings, the in-house clinics provide students the opportunity to learn best practices in all aspects of client representation under the close supervision of our nationally ranked clinical law faculty. From representing young people facing suspension from school to helping microenterprises fight “corporate bullying,” students in the clinics help solve real world problems for clients who would otherwise go unrepresented.

Each of the 10 in-house clinics trains students to be practice-ready by teaching key legal skills in the context of a real world client/problem; asking students to consistently reflect on their performance; and documenting improvements in skills over time. This reflective process allows students to move from learning the law to doing the law and doing it well. By the end of the year, students in every clinic have interviewed and counseled clients, engaged in strategic decision making and advocated for their clients’ interests. It’s what makes clinic alumni consistently say that their clinic was the best experience they had in law school.

Find out more at the Clinical Programs information session Thursday, February 20, 2014 from 2-4pm in the Function Room.

 

Clinical Program Facts and History

Eligibility

Eligibility

To be eligible to enroll in most in-house clinics, students must be in their last two years of law school. Suffolk Defenders and Suffolk Prosecutors are only open to students in their final year.

In addition, students must be eligible to be certified as student practitioners pursuant to Rule 3:03 of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”). Suffolk has adopted this rule and requires that all students applying for a clinic be both:

 

Students with questions about good academic standing or satisfactory grades should consult with the Dean of Students.

  • No more than 12 clinical credits may be accumulated by any student.

 

 

Expectations

Expectations

Students who accept a slot in the in-house clinics must commit to being in the clinic for a full academic year. (8 credits) Partial credit is not available. Students interested in a one-semester experience can explore the various internship offerings.

Students receive one letter grade at the end of the academic year which is the grade for the full 8 credits of the clinic. Clinical faculty will provide a verbal evaluation at the end of the first semester and a written evaluation at the end of the academic year based on detailed grading criteria.

Students enrolled in an in-house clinic have a total credit limit of 15 credit hours. Overloads are not allowed due to the time demands involved in the clinics.

The time commitment for the clinics includes:

  • a weekly clinic seminar that focus on lawyering skills and ethics;
  • a weekly supervision meeting that focuses on professional development and case strategy;
  • at least 13 hours a week of field work (please note that 13 hours a week is the minimum number of hours required and students should consult relevant clinical faculty about the average number of hours required)
While regular feedback and supervision is offered, students are expected to be self-directed in their learning.

 

As further detailed in the grading criteria, clinic students are expected to demonstrate the following by the end of the academic year:

  • professional habits and judgment,
  • an understanding of ethical obligations,
  • fundamental lawyering skills and values,
  • critical thinking,
  • cross-cultural competence, including client-centered lawyering, listening and non-legal language skills.

 

 

Application

Application

There is a uniform application for the in-house clinics, the Suffolk Prosecutors program, and several other internship programs.  The specific programs associated with the uniform application are listed on that form, which is available in the Clinical Programs office in late February.  The application requires that students complete a series of short answer questions and attach a current resume and transcript (unofficial is fine). 

The application for 2014 will be made available on February 18, 2014 and is due no later than Thursday, March 6 at 5:00pm.  Late applications are reviewed only after all other applications are considered. Applications must be submitted in person. Email and fax may not be used for application submission.

The in-house clinics and some of the internships (i.e., Suffolk Prosecutors and BWAP ) select students based on a student’s overall application, including the statement of interest, review of a student’s transcript, resume, and prior experience.  In some cases, preference in these programs is also given to students with relevant foreign language fluency or completion of relevant courses.  Some programs require an interview prior to acceptance.  Please refer to the Clinical Programs Registration Packet (available in the Clinical Programs office along with the application) for more details on individual program requirements and preferences. There will be an information session for 2014 on February 20, 2014 from 2:00-4:00pm in the Function Room.  Clinical faculty and current students will be available to assist with questions. 

Results of the selection process will be mailed to students prior to early registration. Students should expect to receive an offer of placement in an in-house clinic or a letter indicating that they have been accepted into an internship.  Students must respond to the offer of placement in an in-house clinic.  Placements in internships are not contingent on a student's acceptance and are final on the date the placement letter is sent. Subsequent withdrawal from an internship placement can result in students being barred from participation in other programs.  Thus, it is vital that students speak with all relevant faculty about their goals and plans.

Students applying using the uniform application are reminded that they may not simultaneously apply to the Civil and Judicial Internship Program.  Students should, however, contact Professor Bernadette Feeley if they are simultaneously interested in the Civil and Judicial Internship Program and one of the programs on the uniform application.  Failure to apprise Professor Feeley can result in students being barred from participation in that program (i.e., if a student is placed in another internship and then withdraws, that student is not eligible for another internship or in-house clinic in that semester.)

 

Conflict of Interest

Conflicts of Interest

Students are ineligible for clinical programs if their employment presents an actual conflict of interest with any of the in-house clinics. Because the in-house clinics are viewed as a single law firm, students who are engaged in employment that conflicts with the clients of any of the clinics are disqualified under Mass R. Prof. C. 1.7 and 1.10.

Clinical Programs Facts and History

Suffolk’s first clinical programs included the Suffolk Defenders, Prosecutors and Family Advocacy.  As an extension of the law school's mission to work with marginalized communities, these programs were founded by faculty and lawyers committed to working with students to reach the most vulnerable clients. As early as 1972, Suffolk Law students were representing defendants in criminal courts and parties to divorces. Soon after, Suffolk Prosecutors began sending students to work with the district attorney’s offices around the Boston area. Later, the Evening Landlord-Tenant clinic, Housing Clinic and Juvenile Justice Clinics were added to expand the program to serve more students and a wider range of clients. Since 2005, Suffolk Law expanded its offerings to include immigration, health law, indigenous peoples and Indian law and intellectual property and entrepreneurship. More than 40 years later, the program boasts 14 experiential learning opportunities including internships both domestically and internationally. Its commitment to excellence has earned top rankings in U.S. News & World Report, including the 2014 ranking as the 17th Clinical Program in the country.