JD/MSCJS

The JD/MSCJS degree program is designed to serve the needs of professionals who must be conversant with legal principles and techniques as they work both within and beyond the boundaries of the crime and justice system. Problem-solving in the areas of crime, justice and social policy create the need for specialized training in both law and the social sciences as well as the interconnection between the two. As the complexity of human problems encourages more flexible, sensitive and multi-faceted responses to conflict and social problems, education that bridges the traditionally distinctive fields of crime and justice and law becomes increasingly valuable.

Admission Requirements

Candidates for the JD/MSCJS program must meet the admission criteria for both the MS in Crime and Justice Studies, as determined by the College of Arts and Sciences, and the JD, as determined by the Law School. The LSAT is required by the University Law School. The JD/MSCJS program is open to both Day and Evening Division students. There is no limit to the number of qualified students admitted to the joint program. The Law School requires candidates for admission to have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university and to have taken the LSAT by February of the year of application. Applications must be submitted to the Law School by March 1. For further information, contact the Graduate Admissions Office, Suffolk University, 8 Ashburton Place, Boston, Massachusetts 02108-2770, (617) 573-8302 or Suffolk University Law School Admissions Office, 120 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02108, (617) 573-8144.

Accreditation

Suffolk University is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). The Law School is accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA) and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS).

Curriculum Requirements

The curriculum requirements for the JD/MSCJS program are determined by the respective schools. The JD/MSCJS degrees will be granted upon completion of 104 semester hours of work. Of this number, 80 semester hours must be completed in the Law School and 24 hours in the College of Arts and Sciences MSCJS curriculum. Specific programs and course selections are arranged through the Associate Dean’s office in the Law School and the Office of the Director of the MSCJS program.

All summer credits applied to the final semester of the joint degree program have been determined based on the semester credits of each individual program so as not to permit students to enroll in fewer than two credits in the final semester.

All joint degree candidates are subject to II (G) of the Rules and Regulations limiting credit for ungraded activities to two credits per semester. Any student who is not in good academic standing is disqualified from the joint degree programs. Law School Regulation VII (E) states that a joint degree candidate, who is academically deficient (as defined in the Law School regulations) within the Law School curriculum, shall be disqualified from the joint degree.

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements: 104 credits (80 Law School  credits, 24 College of Arts & Sciences credits)

The curriculum requirements for the JD/MSCJS program are determined by the respective schools. The JD/MSCJS degrees will be granted upon completion of 104 semester hours of work. Of this number, 80 semester hours must be completed in the Law School and 24 hours in the College of Arts and Sciences MSCJS curriculum. Specific programs and course selections are arranged through the Associate Dean’s office in the Law School and the MSCJS program director.

All summer credits applied to the final semester of the joint degree program have been determined based on the semester credits of each individual program so as not to permit students to enroll in fewer than two credits in the final semester.

All joint degree candidates are subject to II (G) of the Rules and Regulations limiting credit for ungraded activities to two credits per semester. Any student who is not in good academic standing is disqualified from the joint degree programs. Law School Regulation VII (E) states that a joint degree candidate, who is academically deficient (as defined in the Law School regulations) within the Law School curriculum, shall be disqualified from the joint degree.

Application to the joint degree program may be made before entering Suffolk University, during the first year of full-time study in the MSCJS program or during the first or second year of study in the Law School. The following tracks correspond to the three possible points of entry: first year MSCJS; first year Law School; second year Law School.

Track I

First Year

Fall Semester

  • CJ-701 Seminar in Crime & Justice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. A sociological investigation of the relationship between crime and justice in contemporary American society. The possibilities and limits of traditional approaches to crime control are examined in the context of our search for harmony, justice and social change. Problems in evaluating the techniques, goals, and effectiveness of criminal justice agencies and organizations are considered as well as models for rethinking the scope and nature of our responses to crime.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CJ-702 Research Methods

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. This course provides students with the fundamental tools for evaluating, designing and implementing basic and applied empirical research in criminal justice. The association between theories and research methods used in the study of criminal justice is explored through a variety of related data sources. Topics covered include: the principles of research design; issues in measurement; modes of observation; basic methods of data analysis; and ethical concerns. Students will obtain hands-on experience in project design through the development of their own research proposal.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

Choose 2 courses from an approved list of courses in a specialized area of Crime and Justice Studies.

Spring Semester

  • CJ-681 Crime and Communities

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Program. This course will examine the relationship among crime, criminal justice and the community as well as the impact of crime on local neighborhoods and community institutions. The role of the community in the criminal justice system and processes of social control are also examined. Topics covered include: local measurement of crime statistics; community policing; prevention and early intervention strategies; community corrections and intermediate sanctions. Strategies for empowering local communities to address the quality of life in the urban environment are also explored.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CJ-688 Restorative Justice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Restorative justice is a philosophical framework which poses an alternative to our current way of thinking about crime and justice. Through restorative justice, all the stakeholders to crime - victims, offenders, families, the wider community and the state - are active in response to crime. This course examines both the theoretical foundation of restorative justice rooted in a variety of legal and religious traditions; and the array of practices associated with restorative justice from around the world. Restorative justice philosophy and practice has impacted all areas of the criminal justice system including policing, probation, courts and the correctional programming for juvenile and adult offenders. Students will be afforded a hands-on experience through role-playing, guest speakers and field trips in the application of restorative values to contemporary justice system. Students will examine the meaning of justice in their own experiences, and be challenged to envision a community-based restorative response to crime and violence.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CJ-709 Quantitative Analysis

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. This course introduces students to the foundations of statistical analysis. Topics include: measures of central tendency; dispersion; probability; sampling distributions; hypothesis testing; correlations; and regression. Using SPSS software, students will be required to apply statistical concepts to existing data resulting in a completed research project.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CJ-708 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice Profession

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the ethics of criminal justice professionals' use of deceptive interrogation, undercover operations, confidential informants, excessive force, and fabricated evidence; the ethics of prosecutors, prisons, and whistle-blowing; and administrative approaches, such as ethics training, to ethical problems, such as corruption. Students will learn the major schools of ethical thought, including utilitarianism, ethical formalism, and the ethics of care, so that they can assess situations systematically. The course relies on real-life ethical problems from news outlets and government reports.

    Term:

    Occasional

Choose 1 course from an approved list of courses in a specialized area of Crime and Justice Studies.

Second Year

Fall Semester

    2040 AD Contracts

    2060 AD Property

    2070 AD Civil Procedure

    2080 AD Criminal Law

    1000 AD Legal Practice Skills

    Spring Semester

      2040 AD Contracts

      2050 AD Torts

      2060 AD Property

      2090 AD Constitutional Law

      1000 AD Legal Practice Skills

      Third Year

      2140 AD Professional Responsibility


      This course may be taken at any time during the second or third year of Law School.

      At the end of the first year of Law School, students must complete at least three courses chosen from a Base Menu as specified by the Law School.

      Fourth Year

      Fall Semester

      Electives in Law


      Students are encouraged to concentrate in specific areas relevant to their interest in crime and justice by selecting classes and clinics/internships from available offerings. Evening students who have not completed their MSCJS requirements may elect to enroll in one of the Internships or Practica in Crime and Justice Studies (CJ 783, 784, 785) to obtain direct experience in the field.

      Spring Semester

      Electives in Law

      Track II

      Track II of the JD/MSCJS program is substantially the same as Track I except that the first- and second-year curricula are reversed. This track is for first-year law students entering the joint degree program.

      Track III

      This track is for second-year law students entering the joint degree program. During years three and four, these students will take both law and MSCJS courses.

      The Law School Curriculum and Requirements are available on the Law School website.