The MSCJS/MPA Program is designed for the public safety professional. This 18-course program consists of 10 MPA courses and 8 CJ courses. Upon completion of your study, you will have earned two degrees.

This 18-course program consists of 6 required MPA courses, 4 MPA electives, 4 required Crime and Justice Studies courses, and 4 Crime and Justice Studies electives.

MPA/MS Crime and Justice Studies

MPA Required Courses (18 credits/6 courses)

  • P.AD-711 Foundations of Public Service and Administration

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This introductory graduate-level course provides an overview of public administration and service and serves as a basis for further advanced studies in the MPA program. This course covers the structure, functions, and process of public service organizations at various levels, including governments and nonprofit organizations. Students explore historical trends, ethical considerations, and political rationale for the present operations of public service.

  • P.AD-713 Managing Financial Resources

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and values that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decisions making; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structures and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

  • P.AD-716 Public Service Human Resource Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

  • P.AD-717 Organizational Change

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students explore small groups and organization operations, practices, behaviors, and structures. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of Classicists; leadership; organizational development, and result-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation and change.

  • P.AD-718 Leadership Strategies for an Interconnected World

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Leadership is a critical ingredient of successful communities and organizations. This course develops a diagnostic framework as well as strategies and tactics to mobilized adaptive work, engage multiple government, no-profit, and business stakeholders, and build awareness and momentum for actions at all levels of government and community and in one's organization. It introduces the catalytic model of leadership and applies it to the ethical handling of societal and organizational problems. Students' leadership competencies are reviewed and improved. This course is designed for people from diverse backgrounds with varied experienced in the leadership role.

  • P.AD-890 Strategic Management

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to students that have completed 30 credits.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Prerequisite: Students must have completed 30 credit hours. Students will integrate the substance of previous courses in order to develop a capacity for strategic management based on a personal perspective of the role of the professional manager in the policy making process. This holistic perspective is expressed in an extensive research paper that describes the leadership role of the professional manager and defines a basis for ethical action. The course features the review of research articles, the discussion of case studies, and a consideration of future trends in public and non-profit management.

    Type:

    MBA Public Management

MPA Electives (12 credits/4 courses)

Choose any four (4) PAD 800 or 900 level elective courses

Students must complete 30 credits hours in the Institute for Public Service; PAD and CJS electives are not interchangeable

Students with no professional public management experience must take:  

  • P.AD-859 Public Service Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Registration requires professor's approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Instructor's signature required for registration. Students with no public administration work experience will be required to take PAD 859 (Internship) at admission. This is a 3-credit course that requires both class attendance and a 300-hour work requirement. If you are required to take PAD 859, it will count as one of your PAD elective. If you are interested in a career change, and you are not required to take the internship at admission, you may take PAD 859 as an elective.

    Type:

    MBA Public Management

*this will count as an elective.

Students who take CJ 786/787 do not need to take PAD 859 and can take an additional MPA elective.

Students are required to meet with their CJS faculty advisor prior to registering for classes. It is recommended that students meet with their faculty advisor in each department when determining their program.

 

CJS Required Courses (12 Credits/4 Courses)

  • CJ-681 Crime and Communities

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Program. This course will examine the relationship among crime, criminal justice and the community as well as the impact of crime on local neighborhoods and community institutions. The role of the community in the criminal justice system and processes of social control are also examined. Topics covered include: local measurement of crime statistics; community policing; prevention and early intervention strategies; community corrections and intermediate sanctions. Strategies for empowering local communities to address the quality of life in the urban environment are also explored.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-701 Seminar in Crime & Justice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. A sociological investigation of the relationship between crime and justice in contemporary American society. The possibilities and limits of traditional approaches to crime control are examined in the context of our search for harmony, justice and social change. Problems in evaluating the techniques, goals, and effectiveness of criminal justice agencies and organizations are considered as well as models for rethinking the scope and nature of our responses to crime.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-702 Research Methods

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. This course provides students with the fundamental tools for evaluating, designing and implementing basic and applied empirical research in criminal justice. The association between theories and research methods used in the study of criminal justice is explored through a variety of related data sources. Topics covered include: the principles of research design; issues in measurement; modes of observation; basic methods of data analysis; and ethical concerns. Students will obtain hands-on experience in project design through the development of their own research proposal.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-709 Quantitative Analysis

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. This course introduces students to the foundations of statistical analysis. Topics include: measures of central tendency; dispersion; probability; sampling distributions; hypothesis testing; correlations; and regression. Using SPSS software, students will be required to apply statistical concepts to existing data resulting in a completed research project.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

CJS Electives (12 Credits/4 Courses)

  • CJ-657 Perspectives on Drug Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This seminar will explore the challenge of creating effective community responses to the problems of substance abuse, with a special focus on substance abuse in urban poverty areas. Readings will be drawn from the literature of history, psychology, urban ethnography, public health and law. The course will first place drug policy decisions in an historical and empirical framework. After considering special topics related to this framework - racial issues in anti-drug law enforcement, the challenges of creating partnerships among public sector agencies and the community, emerging concepts of addiction, the social demographics of drug use in diverse community contexts - this course will focus on the process of local strategy development, implementation and success measurement. Finally, the course will consider the issues raised in the integration of local and national strategies.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CJ-683 Policing in America

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A sociological examination of contemporary police systems. Attention will be devoted to controversial topics in American policing and will involve comparative analyses with policing in other societies. The major focus of the course is around the relationship of the police and the public. Some examples of topics areas are: policing multicultural populations; managing police discretion; ethnic and gender relations among police personnel; and the rights of defendants.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CJ-685 Seminar in Corrections

    Prerequisites:

    3 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the major issues in the adult correctional system. Traditional incarceration as well as pretrial and post-conviction alternatives will be explored. Covered topics may include: prison and jail overcrowding; issues in classification; mental health and incarceration; substance abuse treatment within the prison setting; prison security and disturbances; vocational and educational programming within prisons; ethics and corrections.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CJ-686 Seminar in Juvenile Justice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the array of issues concerned with the administration and operation of the juvenile justice system. The historical, philosophical, and legal foundations of the juvenile justice system will be examined along with the legal and philosophical changes within the system in contemporary period. Special attention will be given to the Massachusetts model of juvenile corrections and treatment.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CJ-687 Justice & the Community Courts

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines, from the perspective of a working judge, the administration of justice in the community courts. Topics include the role of the judge; relationships between prosecutors, defense lawyers, and the courts; the relationship between the courts and the police; the pros and cons of plea bargaining' the goals of sentencing; and the clash between victim's rights and defendant's rights. Difficult kinds of cases will be addressed, such as cases of domestic violence, child sexual abuse, and crime relating to substance abuse. Questions concerning judicial accountability and the role of judges in the community will also be raised.

  • CJ-688 Restorative Justice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Restorative justice is a philosophical framework which poses an alternative to our current way of thinking about crime and justice. Through restorative justice, all the stakeholders to crime - victims, offenders, families, the wider community and the state - are active in response to crime. This course examines both the theoretical foundation of restorative justice rooted in a variety of legal and religious traditions; and the array of practices associated with restorative justice from around the world. Restorative justice philosophy and practice has impacted all areas of the criminal justice system including policing, probation, courts and the correctional programming for juvenile and adult offenders. Students will be afforded a hands-on experience through role-playing, guest speakers and field trips in the application of restorative values to contemporary justice system. Students will examine the meaning of justice in their own experiences, and be challenged to envision a community-based restorative response to crime and violence.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CJ-691 Intimate Violence & Sexual Assault

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This seminar focuses on two interrelated types of violence, battering and sexual assault. Both of these crimes have been the subject of intense political organizing, cultural controversy, and criminal justice reform over the past 25 years. Together these issues currently account for a significant portion of the work of the police and courts. The research literature on these topics has increased dramatically in recent years. There are now many studies of women victimized by batterings and rape, and of men who commit these crimes. There is a growing body of research on institutional responses to such violence, particularly criminal justice responses. There is new literature on the racial and class dimensions of this violence, on trauma and recovery, and on battering in lesbian and gay relationships. This course examines these crimes from psychological, sociological, and criminal justice perspectives.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CJ-692 Criminal Justice Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the policy implications of various sociological theories of crime and punishment. Focus will be on the analysis of various alternative policies within the criminal justice system both within the U.S. and in Europe. Attention will be given to the politics of crime control and to the role of the media, citizen groups and other interest groups in shaping criminal justice policy.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CJ-694 Critical Victimology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Victimology is the study of crime victims. In the history of criminology and criminal justice, this has been a surprisingly neglected topic. This course investigates the relationship between victims of crime and offenders; the harms suffered by crime victims; recovery from victimization; and the response to crime victims by criminal justice institutions and the helping professions. Critical attention will also be given to victimization occurring within criminal justice institutions as in the case of rape in prisons. Recent changes in criminal justice responses to victims of child abuse, violence against women, and hate crimes will also be addressed. Topics will also include the public reaction to crime victims and recent organizing around victim's rights.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CJ-695 Special Topics

    Prerequisites:

    3 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Thematic investigations of problems and topics in criminal justice. Special topics include but are not limited to the areas of domestic violence and sexual assault; children and crime; crime; justice and popular culture; restorative justice; community policing; drugs and the law, drug policy, crime mapping, counterterrorism policy, female offenders and criminalistics.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-704 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice System

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines two subjects throughout the semester: substantive criminal law (e.g. what is money laundering, the insanity defense, conspiracy?); and criminal procedure: 4th Amendment (search and seizure), 5th Amendment (due process, self-incrimination, double jeopardy, etc.), 6th Amendment (right to a lawyer, public trial, etc..), 8th Amendment (cruel and unusual punishment), 14th Amendment (due process, equal protection of law), 1st Amendment (interaction of criminal law with free expression and with religious rights), and 2nd Amendment (firearms). Unlike other similar undergraduate and graduate courses, this one emphasizes principles and case summaries, de-emphasizes actual cases and case names, and does not entail teaching how to brief (summarize) cases.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-705 Class, Race, Gender & Justice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An in-depth examination of the inequalities within the criminal justice system and its relationship to structural inequalities within the wider society. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical debates on the disparities in law and justice based on race, class and gender. Topics include: wrongful convictions and racial prejudice; the war on drugs and the politics of race; gender and the issue of judicial leniency; victimization and class. Case study materials focus on current debates of seminal issues.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CJ-708 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice Profession

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the ethics of criminal justice professionals' use of deceptive interrogation, undercover operations, confidential informants, excessive force, and fabricated evidence; the ethics of prosecutors, prisons, and whistle-blowing; and administrative approaches, such as ethics training, to ethical problems, such as corruption. Students will learn the major schools of ethical thought, including utilitarianism, ethical formalism, and the ethics of care, so that they can assess situations systematically. The course relies on real-life ethical problems from news outlets and government reports.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CJ-783 Practicum in Crime & Justice Studies I

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum. 3 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This practicum is designed for the working professional graduate student who does not anticipate a career change but intends to seek advancement in their profession. The purpose of this practicum is to allow the student (1) to integrate what they learned in the classroom with their professional career, (2) to anticipate future opportunities in their profession, and (3) to develop a formal network of well-established colleagues. Students register for one semester and must meet with the practicum advisor in the semester prior to the practicum. Library research, interviewing, and a presentation will be required. Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-784 Practicum in Crime & Justice Studies II

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum. 3 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This practicum is designed for the working professional graduate student who does not anticipate a career change but intends to seek advancement in their profession. The purpose of this practicum is to allow the student (1) to integrate what they learned in the classroom with their professional career, (2) to anticipate future opportunities in their profession, and (3) to develop a formal network of well-established colleagues. Students register for one semester and must meet with the practicum advisor in the semester prior to the practicum. Library research, interviewing, and a presentation will be required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-786 Internship in Crime & Justice Studies I

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging an internship. 3 credits.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Placements are designed for the student who has no previous experience in a criminal justice agency or for the professional who wants to make a career change. The primary objective is to provide the student with the opportunity to experience the day-to-day functioning of a criminal justice agency. The student may register for one or two semesters and must meet with the internship advisor in the semester prior to the placement. A minimum commitment of working one day per week per semester (total minimum of 110 hours per semester) is required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-787 Internship in Crime & Justice Studies II

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum. 3 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Placements are designed for the student who has no previous experience in criminal justice or for the professional who wants to make a career change. The primary objective is to provide the student with the opportunity to experience the day-to-day functioning of a criminal justice agency. The student may register for one or two semesters and must meet with the internship advisor in the semester prior to the placement. A minimum commitment of working one day per week per semester (total minimum of 110 hours per semester) is required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • CJ-910 Independent Study

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students pursue an in-depth research project under the direction of a qualified member of the graduate faculty.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring